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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

GIELGUD THEATRE



 

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME (play)
Ends 3rd June 2017.
SUITABLE FOR THOSE AGED 13 AND OVER. CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE, FLASHING LIGHTS AND SMOKE EFFECTS.




Motherless Christopher, in the grip of behavioural issues, still wants to find out who killed Mrs Shears' dog. What he discovers changes his life.

Mark Haddon's amazing book is adapted for the stage by Simon Stephens, with Marianne Elliott directing, in a production first seen at the Cottesloe Theatre in the summer of 2012. Transfers here from the Apollo Theatre run in 2013.

NOTE: DO stay until after the final bows are taken. Even if it seems nothing will happen... it will...

A post-show discussion with members of the cast usually takes place after the first Tuesday Evening performance of each month.




 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

This review refers to a previous cast who have now left the production.

(Seen at the afternoon performance at the Apollo Theatre on 6th July 2013)

As book to stage adaptations go, this one is aided greatly by Bunny Christie, Finn Ross and Paule Constable creating an environment which is not only a physical representation of Christopher's world, but also a platform for his psychological one. Mariann Elliott's stylised direction, assisted by Scott Graham and Steven Hoggett further delineate the ordered world in which this genius lives.

Within this concept, a hugely talented company shine. Everything that has been written about Luke Treadaway is true. So deeply involved in his performance, even a stray shred of paper and reluctant pup become another facet of his personality - a difficult character brought blazingly to life.

The cast around him, though, deserve equal praise. Niamh Cusack as his teacher keeps the narrative going, Holly Aird as his mother provides a heat-melting moment, Tilly Tremayne creates an unforgettable neighbour and Rhiannon Harper-Rafferty an equally perfect study of London Transport's least finest. For the gentlemen, Sean Gleeson does wonders with an ultimately unsympathetic character and Matthew Barker, Howard Ward and Nick Sidi juggle a number of characters with conviction.

As emotionally colourful as the frenetic staging, it's a complex tale that perhaps could have been shortened a trifle by removing the odd item of Christopher's life that doesn't seem quite relevant as we have the visual idea. That said, it moves quickly (with some brilliantly creative moments in act two) and to say more would ruin it for anybody who WILL, after reading this, buy a ticket.

Touches your spread palm, in the deepest possible way.
 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

(10 reviews from the current production)

Unlike the Apollo, they did not mark "prime numbered seats" with special covers.

Also, it looks like the far side seats are going to have a restricted view of the walls. We were in Row P, and I think a few rows back are going to have the top of the set obstructed. But, I can’t say for sure. There’s not a lot at the top of the set – but some of the escalator magic might be missed.

Couldn’t tell how high the stage was. Didn’t seem much higher than for 'Blithe Spirit' – but front row definitely will have to strain a bit and the boxes will miss out on the sides.

Our 13 year old loved the play – it was up there with Matilda and Light Princess for her.

My wife and I thought the actor playing Christopher was not as good as the young man we saw last autumn. The one we saw originally was more natural – this actor seemed to be acting more at times. Very subtle and if we hadn’t seen the prior performance, might have found the new actor just fine or more than fine.
______________________________________

The Show

We went to see this on Friday 5th September 2014 – I originally wanted to go and see 'Book Of Mormon,' but my wife wasn’t convinced she could take the humour - so I had a look around and knew this had received good write ups and it was something she wanted to see. I will confess I am not really a play-goer – last one I saw was "An Inspector Calls" at the Garrick many years ago – I’m more of a musical man.

To update another reviewer, the Gielgud is now putting seat covers on the prime numbered seats – I got to my seat and was a bit shocked to find the cover as I thought it meant the seat was reserved. Luckily it was just a prime numbered seat, and my wife’s name did turn out to be prime numbered too so she got a prize (a badge) – it’s like a badge of honour on the underground after the performance finishes as people know what the badge means - and it certainly gets people talking to each other!

This was amazing – more than just a play – a mixture of music, movement and drama. Graham Butler was 'in the zone' as Christopher – I guess this is another event where the person playing the lead character will have a big impact on how you enjoy the show. Special mentions to Sarah Woodward (Siobhan) and Nicholas Tennant (Dad) who are on stage for virtually the whole performance too – but the whole cast hang together very well and are faultless.

Parts funny, parts tragic, parts moving: the play takes you through it all – through Christopher trying to solve who killed the dog to him finding out about his mother and getting his exam result at the end.

The journey of Christopher to see his mother is fantastically well done – the projections used are fabulous as he goes from home to London and then tries to get to his mother; the way they have tried to simulate what’s going on in Christopher's head when he has a fit is very effective as well – and SPOILER ALERT the escalator was totally unexpected and amazing. SPOILER ENDS.

I liked the way they put in the play that Christopher might explain how he solved the question later, and then the cast looked toward the audience – not sure how many people got it... after curtain call everyone around got up but I sat down and told wife that something was going to happen but she didn’t believe me! I’m not sure how long they left it as it seemed pretty quick after the curtain call that the music started up again and Christopher rose up from beneath the stage – not many people would have had a chance to leave. It was fun and absolutely amazing how he explained it – I was ok up to Pythagoras’ theorem but I was lost after n2 x n2 I’m afraid, but it was fascinating to watch as the 4 minute clock counted down.

Although I could hear the cast, I did think at times voices sounded a bit quiet – not sure if the cast are miked up or not – the music and effects were certainly loud enough.

We both came out of the theatre thinking we had seen something special – something we’d probably go to see again if we had the chance to.

The Seats
We sat in Seats G19 and G20 in the stalls – G19 gave a slightly better view of things as it seemed more offset to the seats in front and the view of the stage was for the most part clear. The rake isn’t great here, but I was able to just see over the taller gentleman's head who was sitting in front when I needed to see stage left. You can just about see the left hand side wall of the graph paper from these seats. The stage floor slopes towards the audience but you can’t really see what is happening, but I think for the most part what was drawn on the floor was replicated to the back screen. Seats were comfortable for the most part – only towards the end of the acts did I start to feel a bit fidgety; legroom OK as well for this 5 foot 10 inch theatregoer.
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After an aborted planned trip last Jan to 'Curious Incident' at Apollo because of ceiling issues, we rebooked for the Gielgud and went in July 2014.

Based on Monkey comments and price bands, we opted for centre of Dress Circle row E (seats 17 to 20). Good comfy seats and a really good view of the amazing show.

But sitting in front of us in, I guess, 'premium priced' seats were 4 American tourists who seemed to treat the show like a baseball game. Much eating and Coke slurping; and in both halves of the show we had to ask them to refrain from leaning forward (why did they need to in 'Premium View' seats anyway?!) as our excellent view was otherwise obscured by their supersized frames.

I know the London theatre relies heavily on tourists, but maybe ( a la Mark Kermode for cinemas?) some gentle guidance could be provided to patrons by theatres as to how to behave in a way that won't spoil the ( very expensive!) experience for others.
__________________________________________

2014. We had hoped to see it last Christmas, but of course circumstances intervened! We went to the TKTS booth and bought two tickets for J9 and 10 in the Stalls, £61 each. When we arrived we found someone in our seats! We found an usher who was apologetic enough but told us we had been ‘upgraded’ to better seats. Our new seats were G17 and 18. According to the tickets these were cheaper! How is that an upgrade? I thought the seats probably were 1 or 2 rows too close to the stage. Legroom was sufficient, nothing more. It was difficult to see that Christopher was laying a railway track on the stage. I don’t think we missed anything but it did leave a bit of a bad taste in my mouth that we clearly had not been ‘upgraded’ at all. I would say that you need to sit close to the stage as the actors are unmiked.

As for the show we really enjoyed it. One of the best I’ve saw in many years in fact. Highly recommended indeed!
_________________________________________

Stalls Seat E23 and E24: January 2015.
I should have compromised legroom for better view, but did the other way around instead. I opted for legroom comfort (I'm 6'2'') with seat E24 having nothing in front as mentioned. However, I feel we missed out too much with the view: the stage floor as well as the left stage wall. My opinion, especially for this show, is to go for seats in the dress our upper circle AND centred, to fully enjoyed the visual effects.

The show was fantastic, main actor Graham Butler is really impressive, no wonder he is so skinny with all the energy he spent on stage! This is not a "conventional" play (neither is the story) it has a lot of visual/sounds effects and with the high quality acting it makes a great experience. Definitely recommended!
_________________________________________

So glad I eventually got round to seeing this! Even sweet wrappers, water bottles, casual conversations and mobile lights failed to destroy the magic of this production for me. Beautifully paced with stunning effects ( especially the illuminated model train! ) and gifted ensemble playing. The unusually stylised form of production ensured the tale did not drag and kept Christopher metaphorically and literally at the centre.

In Graham Butler as Christopher we have another star from the ever-productive Guildhall School stable ( like Rob Callender who so impressed as Guy in 'Another Country' last year ). The energy, sensitivity and physicality of his performance made this a memorable production.

I learned more about autism from this show than from all I had garnered before.

Last day ticket (B17) available at 1.40 pm for the Thursday 22nd January 2015 2.30pm performance.
__________________________________________

1st October 2015.

THE SEAT: Stalls, B17. After other plans didn’t work out, I strolled to the box office as late as 11 a.m., but was lucky enough to get the very last day seat. The stage is quite high, you have to stretch your neck to see the floor, but I think all the projections are visible on the walls as well (I hope), so it should be okay. Also, for just 15 quid it’s hard to complain about anything.

THE SHOW: Read the book, loved it. Was sceptical of the play, but boy, what a treat! Phenomenal stage and sound design, inventive direction, great actors. While the book is of course much more detailed and emotionally involving, the play feels fresh and bold and original, and the theatrical experience as a whole is certainly one of the better ones I’ve ever had.
__________________________________________

Having greatly enjoyed Mark Haddon’s novel I was looking forward to seeing how they would bring such a small story to the stage.

The set acts as an extension of Christopher’s mind, which I thought worked well. It was an interesting way to show the thought processes of Christopher: A fifteen-year-old boy with Asperger’s syndrome.

The show can entertain a large audience but still feels intimate. It might have helped that I was seated very close to the stage though. It's such a moving story, captured perfectly on stage. I was impressed.

The acting throughout was immaculate and intense. Having spent many years looking after a boy with autism I was pleased with how realistic a portrayal was given. Not just Christopher but every role was performed well, with a minimal cast.

Definitely worth a watch to anyone looking for a poignant piece of theatre. And there a few laughs in there too.

5 out of 5.
December 2014.

Seat review: Centre of row G. We had great seats, central and close to the stage. I really think this is a show to see from the stalls. Just my opinion, but you feel so much more involved from this position. It’s an intimate story. It helps if you can see the actors faces.
____________________________________________

Thursday Evening, 25th February 2016

This bad theatregoer, previously thwarted by a collapsing ceiling, finally got round to the multi-award-winning "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time" at the Gielgud Theatre. From my seat in the centre of the Grand Circle I had a good view of all but the extreme forestage, and for many of the stage effects the high viewpoint was a positive advantage. All but a very few ensemble lines were clearly audible.

I guess you all know by now what this one's about. 15-year-old Christopher sets his emotionally damaged but eminently logical mind - symbolised by the Matrix-inspired set - to solving a canine murder, only to discover a few things about his family and himself too.

National Theatre productions can go overboard with physical theatre, ensemble involvement, set mechanics and sound design. But sometimes it all comes together, and "Curious Incident" is one of those times. It's clever, witty, engaging, wonderfully theatrical and only slightly too long. If you haven't yet - do!
_______________________________

SEATS:
Dress Circle, A15, A16.
I had a shock on the day, when I looked the the tickets and found I had paid a booking fee of about £50. How had that happened without my realising it? I had wondered how I had managed to get possibly the best seats in the house at a few weeks' notice.

As someone who walks with a stick, I found the journey down the vertiginous steps to my seat so terrifying that I refused to go to the bar at the interval even though there was a drink waiting for me. Never again will I sit in the front row: I really had the feeling I would tumble over the edge if I stood up.


THE PERFORMANCE:
Fantastic in every way.

!7th March 2016, matinee.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

(3 reviews from the 2013 Apollo Theatre production)

Got two tickets in the balcony through NT box office 7 days ago. They often have tickets come up for sale so it's worth taking a look often.

The play is simply stunning. Luke Treadway deserves all the awards going. Beg for a ticket.

Another triumph for the National Theatre.

Later visit, October 2013: First saw this four months ago. New cast and still as brilliant as the first time. Took my eldest son. He was totally blown away.

Taljaard.
______________________________

I haven’t read the book, but heard great things about the show - so was keen to see it whilst the main guy is still playing the lead. The set and production are bl**dy impressive. Walled with graph paper we are invited in to the world of Christopher, a 15 year old ‘on the spectrum’ with Asperger’s (or similar autistic difficulties), and an ability to do maths. The book is written in the first person and this adaptation uses his lovely teacher (Niamh Cusack) as his voice a lot of the time. She has got him to make a play about his ‘detecting’ so she is reading from his writing.

Having found his next door neighbour’s dog speared with a garden fork, Christopher sets about finding out who killed it. This uncovers a tangled web of deceit, lies and emotional relationships which is confusing for him. He likes straight lines, logic and the truth, He does not understand why sometimes it is easier or kinder to lie as he cannot.

This is intense theatre with Luke Treadaway magnetic and mesmerising and physically adept. The choreographed scenes are beautifully and cleverly done and although there is meant to be some humour, I did not find myself laughing very often as this was in many ways a tragedy. Seeing the world through his eyes – the confusion and panic when it is all too much for him and he starts moaning and covering his ears is heart-rending.

But it satisfies one of my requirements for theatre; it made me think. And reminded me how difficult the world can be for others. And as we sat in a little bar afterwards we all realised we were those unpleasant, exasperated commuters brilliantly evoked in the second half and I think we all hope we will be a little more tolerant and understanding.

Until the next tourist stops in their tracks immediately in front of me, or wanders aimlessly from side to side not allowing me to overtake, or nearly knocks me flying with their rucksack………….

Definitely worth seeing. So why only three and a half stars? I’m not entirely sure, but I think it is something to do with there not really being any light or shade. That it is so full on all the time. That it is all about him, and the other characters are relatively shallow and stereotypical. But that’s exactly how life is for him, so it is in many ways an unfair criticism. But at the end of the day my star ratings are about my over-all enjoyment and the clapometer stops at three and a half.

July 26th, 2013.
_______________________________

24th August 2013. There are two words that are very overused in today's 'reality' society, emotional and journey. I get sick to death of hearing them, but I now find that I have to use them both.

This play is one big emotional journey. Excellently played by all. We did not see Luke Treadaway, but the lad we did see fitted Christopher perfectly for me. The rest of the cast gel beautifully, and if you are not moved by this play you are made of stone. It is a privilege to enter Christopher's world, and be enchanted by the honesty within it. Sometimes painful, but immensely rewarding.

____________________________________________

(2 reviews from the 2012 Cottesloe Theatre production)

I attended the very first night preview of Curious Incident last night (24th July 2012) as a last minute idea for something to do (fortunately they had a single standing ticket for just £5 and I managed to sit down in an empty seat!) and boy, was I glad I did!

It is an amazing production of what is probably considered to be a 'difficult' book to stage due to the meandering thoughts of the narrator, rather than straight forward narrative text.

The production is a mind blowing triumph, almost (and only almost), to the point where you are awed by the effects on stage at the expense of the dialogue. The stage is simply a large piece of graph paper, without any other scenery (apart from multi purpose white boxes), onto which is projected all necessary information, such as the floor plans of neighbours houses and the scenery from a moving train. Most characters are on stage the whole time as they interact with the thoughts and actions of Christopher, helping with scenery props and physically forming pieces of furniture. As such it feels a bit 'experimental' and edgy, but none the worse for that. It is certainly very different to the normal West End theatre night out.

The book (and so the play) are both equally funny, poignant and very moving. You really get inside the troubled head of Christopher as he struggles to make sense of a world of complicated relationships and scary mechanics. The terror of a simple train and tube journey for him are brilliantly conveyed with the most basic of flashing lights and body movements.

Apart from the constantly impressive stagecraft, the success of the production must go to Luke Treadaway who plays Christopher. He is a stunning actor who is on stage speaking almost continuously for the whole play, and when he isn't speaking he is physically interpreting the inner turmoil of the character. He conveys the simple honesty and vulnerability of Christopher brilliantly, so much so that I came away with a profound sense of understanding of living life with Asperger's Syndrome. If he isn't a shoe in for an Olivier nomination next time then there is no justice. The Labrador puppy who steals the show at the end also deserves an award, if the number of 'aaaahs' he generated from the audience is anything to go by!

Go see 'The Curious Incident', you won't be disappointed.

Peter Mills
___________________________________________

Just go!

I attended the second preview performance of 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Tim'e and had I been wearing socks, they'd have been blown right off. I endorse everything said by Peter Mills in his excellent review - the first on this site for this production.

Having enjoyed the book hugely, I approached the play with some trepidation, expecting it to prove difficult to adapt - but I needn't have worried. Luke Treadway as Christopher was mesmerising, saying as much with movement as I've ever seen in a young actor. I was moved to tears by scenes between father and son in particular.

Just go.

SE1Monkey



 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Thursday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm

Runs 2 hours 45 minutes approximately.


 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form.


Note: The box office will confirm "peak dates" on enquiry.

All Monday to Thursday "NOT Peak Dates and Final" weeks:
Stalls:
Rows D to R: £65 except:
"Premium Seats" row G to K 8 to 19, L 10 to 17, M 12 to 15: £92.50
Rows O to R 1 and 2, O and Q 25 and 26, P and R 24 and 25: £42.50
Rows S to U: £42.50
Rows V and W: £29.50

Dress Circle:
Rows A to H: £65 except:
"Premium Seats" rows A and B 13 to 22: £92.50
Rows F to H 9, 10, 26, 27: £42.50
Row J: £42.50
Dress Circle Restricted View Slip seats:
Row A: £29.50
Row B: £18

Upper Circle:
Rows A to G (except restricted view seats): £29.50
Rows A to J all restricted view seats, plus "clear view" seats in rows H and J: £18
Row AA slips: £18

Boxes
A, B, C, D: £65 per seat if sold.
E, F and G: £42.50 per seat if sold.
 

 

 

All Friday, Saturday and "Peak Dates and Final" weeks:
Stalls:
Rows C to T: £65 except:
"Premium Seats" row G to K 8 to 19, L 10 to 17, M 12 to 15: £92.50 (£125 at some performances)
Rows U to W: £42.50

Dress Circle:
Rows A to J: £65 except:
"Premium Seats" rows A and B 11 to 24, C 10 to 23: £92.50
Dress Circle Restricted View Slip seats:
Row A: £29.50
Row B: £18

Upper Circle:
Rows A to E (except restricted view seats): £42.50
Rows F and G (except restricted view seats): £29.50
Rows A to J all restricted view seats, plus "clear view" seats in rows H and J: £18
Row AA slips: £18

Boxes
A, B, C, D, E, F and G: £65 per seat if sold.



Some details may change. The monkey will update as available.


Day Seats: A limited number of tickets, including 11 in stalls row B, are available to personal callers at the box office from 10am, priced £15 each. Limited to 2 per person. The monkey always advises taking both cards and cash in case one is preferred over the other. Check with the box office before travelling if this policy is still in operation.

Reader experiences. For most recent ones, click here.
Reader report: Thursday 27th June 2013. Arrived 8:40am for day seats on a matinee day and was 14th in line. Got the last two seats for the matinee.
Reader report: Saturday 13th July 2013: 8.40 am - got the last 2 seats on both ends of the first row for the evening.
Reader report: Tuesday 12th November 2013: 8:30am, 7th in line, 12 people in line at 10am.
Reader report: 19th July 2014. got here at 7:55am, 2 people in front of us. 14 people at 9:45am.
Reader report: 23rd July 2014. 7am. Just me waiting. No one else turned up until 9.15am, and I don't think the line was full by 10am. Maybe just about. Got middle front row - high stage, but worth it!
Reader report: 28th July 2014: Got there at 9:15am, only one person there. 4 people in line at 9:30am; 6 when box office opened at 10am.
Reader report: 31st July 2014. I was 4th in line at 8.15am.
Reader report: 12th August 2014. Sold out of day seats but I went around 2pm and they offered me a £37.50 seat for £25.
Reader report: 3rd September 2014. Second in day seat queue! Arrived 8.30am. There's a dog in the queue too.
Reader report: 22nd October 2014. I got to the box office at about 9.50am and was tenth in the queue and only one other person joined the queue by the time I got served at 10.15am. (2 people dropped out after they realised they were a the wrong theatre as they wanted tix for Les Miz). I got stalls seat L6.
Reader report: 12th January 2015: Arrived at 9am and was first in the queue. Second person arrived at about 9.20am and only 6 in the queue when ticket office opened at 10am. I got 2 tickets right in the middle of row Q (stalls), I then re-joined the queue and got another 2 tickets in the stage level box.
Reader report: 13th January 2015: First in queue at 9am, only two of us still at 9.25am.
Reader report: 21st January 2015: Arrived at 8.30am and was first there, next people didn't arrive until 9.30am! By box office opening at 10am there were about 10 people in total waiting. Suggest a freezing cold Wednesday in January is a good time to try with minimal wait!
Reader report: 22nd January 2015. Got the last day ticket (B17) available at 1.40pm.
Reader report: 3rd February 2015: First in line at 9am.
Reader report: 11th February 2015: Today at 9.20am, first in line. At 10am only 4 people waiting. Got row C seat 12.
Reader report: 21st February 2015: Arrived at 8am. One person already there and one arrived shortly after us. Around 13 people in the queue by 9.30am. There were 11 tickets available for the matinee and 11 for the evening.
Reader report: 6th June 2015: Arrived at 8.23am, and 2 people in front of me.
Reader report: 16th June 2015: We arrived at 8:45am and there were just two of us. 4 at 9am, 6 at 9:45am,
8 at 9:55am and then 11 when the box office opened at 10am. It was quite a disorganised queue, a few discreet jumpers. I asked the box office and was told the current policy is 15 day seats, all £15, all situated in the front row. Issued from centre outwards. Plus, two people were given boxes at either side of the stage. So it's not just the front row they have but they're obviously keen to fill it before issuing box tickets.
Reader report: 4th August 2015: Snagged 2 front row seats. 4 people at 9.15am. 9 by 9.45am. 12 when doors opened.
Reader report: 15th August 2015. Rocked up at 9:30am. 15 people in front, but trying for matinee tickets, we got 3 in row Q in stalls. Not too bad for lining up on a whim quite late!
Reader report: 22nd August 2015. Arrived at 9.20am, 14 people before me. Got Dress Circle seat F15.
Reader report: 12th September 2015. We arrived at 9.30am, when no one was there, about 5 there by 9.45am and 15-20ish when the box office opened. Worth asking the box office on two-show days which will give you better seats if you’re flexible on times.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk provide their own service for this theatre.
This system allows you to select your own seat numbers.

For this production, www.nationaltheatre.org.uk offers an alternative facility, with no booking fee. An optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage charge applies if required and time allows.
 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
No booking fee.



 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

When the box office does not have what you require, the Theatremonkey Ticketshop, telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), offers an extra selection of seats with fees of £21.30 on £125, £20.50 or £15.80 on £92.50, £14.50 or £11.25 on £65, £9.50 or £7.30 on £42.50, £5.25 on £29.50, £4 or £3.25 on £18 Fridays, Saturdays and "peak week" seats) per ticket booking fee. Slightly higher than the box office, but lower than most agencies. Worth checking if the box office cannot provide the exact tickets you might require. Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

Another alternative is www.seetickets.com / telephone 0870 830 0200 (FREE call if using BT.com Calling Plan at your chosen times) which offers seats with fees of £25 on £125, £18.50 on £92.50, £13 on £65, £8.50 on £42.50, £7.90 on £27.50, £3.60 on £18 seats). A £2.75 per booking, not per ticket, transaction charge applies at all performances.

Alternatively, through Ticketmaster with a sliding scale of per ticket booking fees: £10.20 on £92.50, £7.15 on £65, £4.75 on £42.50, £2 on £18 seats). A £3.05 handling fee for your booking on top of that. This system allows you to choose your own seats from the selection the company has available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer seats with fees of £25 on £125, £18.50 on £92.50, £13 on £65, £8.50 on £42.50, £6 on £18 seats). There is a £1 per booking, not per ticket, transaction fee for collecting tickets from the box office before your performance. Alternatively, if time allows, there is a postage to your home option, costing £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer seats with fees of £35 on £125, £26.50 on £92.50, £19 on £65, £12.50 on £42.50, £8.50 on £29.50, £6 on £18 seats) per ticket. A postage charge of £1.45 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £1.99 per ticket. "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.
 

ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.
 

 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0844 482 5130
(020 7812 7498 if you cannot use the 0844 number)
Operated by Delfont-Mackintosh Theatres. At busy times / outside working hours - 9am to 8pm, See Tickets may answer on behalf of the venue.

For this production, the National Theatre Box Office on 020 7452 3000 offers an alternative facility, with no booking fee.
An optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage charge applies if required and time allows.
 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
No booking fee.
 

For personal callers or by post: Shaftesbury Avenue, W1V 8AR
No booking fee for personal callers.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk is the official theatre website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

Refurbished in Summer 2007, to the usual gorgeous Mackintosh standards, with wonderful greens and golds throughout.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Upper Circle Notes
STALLS 

Layout:
Seating is in a single block.

The dress circle overhangs the stalls from row K in the centre, and the boxes and slips also overhanging the first and last three or four seats from around row D back. The top of the stage is not visible from around row R back - purists might even say O, with noticeable loss from row T.

The rake
(sloped floor to help see over rows in front) is noticeable from row K, feels the monkey.

Entrance doors are behind the centre of row W and to the sides of rows F and G approximately.

Legroom:
Adequate for all but the tallest (over 5ft 10 or so) in all seats - and there is space to tuck legs under the seats in front. A reader over 6ft tall indeed found row J cramped - partly because the seat is lower than elsewhere in the venue. Rows B to H are noticeably more cramped than the rest.

Row A 8 to 19 has particularly generous legroom, with only a little less in the other outer pairs of seats in that row.

The very tall should enjoy E24, G24 and N1 which have nothing in front of them; and E4 and G2 which have space for at least one leg to stretch into.

Choosing Seats in General:
Much thought has gone into the layout. All rows are "offset" so that those who are shorter should see between the gaps of the seats in front between the taller folk in front.

Rows A to D are lower to improve sightlines for those behind, previously poor due to the shallow flooring rake.

Usually, the stage is at eye-level for a 5ft 7 monkey, so those in A will look up slightly (not really for neck-ache avoiders, though most should be fine). The row curves, with the central seats 9 to 19 having extra legroom - but even the ends of the row will be adequate for the shorter legged - provided they don't mind sharing seats 6 and 21 with a light fitting off to one side ahead of them.

When row A is in use, one person felt his seat in row A, "was extremely uncomfortable!"

Moving back, the rake begins noticeably at row K, and the monkey liked L too. It would pick L or K 8 to 19 first, then M or J (be aware it is lower than H in front - which helps the viewing angle but not the shortest) or back to Q in that order, then H and G or R to S at top price, or even perhaps saving a few pounds and picking U over these rows at second price.

If of average height (over around 5ft 5) it would choose F to D rather than going further back, as the rake isn't significant. This is simply because there will be fewer heads in front. Do be aware that with someone taller than around 5ft 10 in front the view to the stage may be less than optimal everywhere in the stalls, the monkey felt on first viewing - though it welcomes comments on this and strongly advises personal preference based on previous experiences is taken into account too.

Rows T to W are further back and the rake is rather good there. Row T and row V often driop a price over the row in front - save money if offered S and U by picking these as the view is similar for fewer bananas, feels the monkey.

At third price go for V 8 to 19 first, but the monkey feels itself comfy in any of these rows at lower prices - taking seats 8 to 19 first, for most central views.

Remember that the central Upper Circle is also often available for the same prices as T to W. Those who prefer not to lose a little of the stage to an overhang, and who don't need the extra legroom of the stalls / are not worried by heights will probably also enjoy well-chosen central upstairs seats as much in the monkey view...

General Hazard Notes:
When entering behind row W, watch out for the floor on the left hand "high numbers" side - it's somewhat uneven as you go from entrance door to side aisle, the monkey noticed in 2012.

Row J is lower than the row in front, not great for the shorter theatregoer.

A sound desk makes V 7 to 18, plus W seats 7 and 18 avoidable for purists, feels the monkey, when in use.

Changes for the current production:
The front row is B, used as "day seats" and not bad value. Be aware that seeing the floor and walls is crucial to the experience, so the monkey advises sitting at least 8 rows from the stage.

A reader says,
"It looks like the far side seats are going to have a restricted view of the walls. We were in Row P, and I think a few rows back are going to have the top of the set obstructed. But, I can’t say for sure. There’s not a lot at the top of the set – but some of the escalator magic might be missed.

Couldn’t tell how high the stage was. Didn’t seem much higher than for 'Blithe Spirit' – but front row definitely will have to strain a bit and the boxes will miss out on the sides."

There are a lot of "premium" seats from rows G to M. Luckily, some very good stuff - beside premium seats in rows J back, and from rows N to Q from 8 to 19 - are left for the less plutocratic. You could also brave the pairs of seats next to the premium ones in rows from around J too, the monkey feels. A reader notes that he couldn't see the stage floor from row G either.

Be aware that stalls premium seats are even more expensive than dress circle ones at some peak performances. If tall, pay more. If not, the dress circle has a better view of the stage floor, feels the monkey.

Except on Fridays, Saturdays and "peak weeks," outermost pairs of seats in rows O to R drop to second price, as does row C. The monkey would take central C to see faces, but accept that C misses floor action, and O to R side wall action. Fair value in both, and a way to sit further forward than central S (which has a decent view of everything) if you wish to do so. More for second timers, perhaps.

Rows V and W are a decent bet at third price too, if you don't mind missing a bit of top stage action.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance. The monkey considers that a "Green" seat would become "Light Green" and a "white" seat would become "red" if the price becomes "premium."

The front two rows of the Upper Circle are also available for the same price as rows T to W "off peak" dates, so those who prefer not to lose a little of the stage to an overhang, and who don't need the extra legroom of the stalls / are too short to see over those in front / are not worried by heights will probably also enjoy well-chosen central upstairs seats as much in the monkey view... take row B over A up there, it feels, if legroom is important to you. That said, row T 8 to 19 on "off peak" dates, is well priced, it thinks.

A sound desk may make purists think twice about row W 12 and 17. Shouldn't worry most, though.

 

Reader Comments:
"A8: For a tenner at 11am at the show I saw. The view at 5 foot 7 was fine for me."

“A9: “Hair” (April 2010). Incredible as a £20 “day seat”. Regular Taljaard agreed for “The Ladykillers (December 2011).

"A18 and A19 (front row): “Avenue Q” (2009). Could see everything. Booked through Delfont Mackintosh (tickets £21.75 each for the show I saw - which I thought was a bargain price considering the excellent view of the stage and television screens. (No neck ache at all)."

"A17: "Umbrellas Of Cherbourg" (March 2011). Got for £19.50 as a day ticket during previews. I thoroughly enjoyed it - even got bussed by Meow Meow - Yeow!! Did not find restricted view a problem - felt right in the action with ensemble and diva hovering all around me."

“A18 and 19: "Avenue Q”, (Kirsty). I didn't find the high stage a problem at all, and I could see everything. My very short 5ft friend though, deffo had problems seeing the actors and puppets when they moved to the back of the stage. All the actors were very close up."

"A20 and A21: "Private Lives" (June 2013). I was tempted by the £10 tickets in the front row of the stalls - (didn’t read your comments before booking). What a bad decision. The actual stage has a false floor on top to accommodate a revolve and then on top of that is another false floor that sits the act one balcony sets. We were literally sitting under the balconies and at times could actually see nothing at all due to the acute angle - things did improve a tad in Act 2 when the revolve spun the balconies away but the view was still very poor especially also on the high end numbers due to couches and pieces of set. Whilst the production was 1st rate the poor views etc did spoil the production. Yes they are inexpensive but be aware that you will probably see less than 50% of the show."

"Row B: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time." (This is the) front row, reserved for day seats, and the stage is quite high. Being a shorty at only 5'1" I asked for one of the boosters to put on my seat and could see perfectly."

"B17: "The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time:" After other plans didn’t work out, I strolled to the box office as late as 11 a.m., but was lucky enough to get the very last day seat. The stage is quite high, you have to stretch your neck to see the floor, but I think all the projections are visible on the walls as well (I hope), so it should be okay. Also, for just 15 quid it’s hard to complain about anything."

"C 12 to 14: "The Audience" (March 2013), "Graham." I don't like the stalls  in this theatre as a large head always seems to get in my way, on this occasion a famous DJ was showing me his dandruff....

" Row D (end): “Hair” (April 2010), (Beth). These seats are great, really comfortable and great value for money (if you get them discounted obviously!). I personally rate the Gielgud Theatre highly and think the seats there are really good!! I think I would rather have been further back than Row D."

"D10 and D11: "Lend Me A Tenor: The Musical" (June 2011). The stage was at head height for Row D, and in future I would book slightly further back (F or G). The amplification was ear-burstingly loud at times, and this is another reason to sit further back."

"D13 and 14: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014). Happily we were awarded these (normally £59 seats) for £15 as we were first in the queue on Saturday morning for day seats, and opted for the matinee. We arrived at 9.30am, when no one was there, about 5 there by 9.45am and 15-20ish when the box office opened. Worth asking the box office on two-show days which will give you better seats if you’re flexible on times. The view was very good, but because of the lack of rake there are heads in the way, and you’re just about at floor level with the stage so you can’t see any of the floor projections. The show is designed such that important floor story-points are mirrored on the wall but still it would mildly enhance the experience if you could be further back with a little bit of height. Nothing missed apart from that."

"Row E: "The Audience" (March 2013), (Helen Best). Our seats were not good – right at the end of Row E and you had to lean forward all the time to see."

"Row E: "Blithe Spirit" (March 2014), (Graham). I'm not a fan of the basement level in the auditorium as the rakes are usually poor and large heads block views etc. Here at the Gielgud is no exception, although last night it was my own head that seemed to be getting in the way of the short woman behind. I did try to sink down in my seat but the legroom for me (6 foot) was too poor."

“E15: "Equus" (March 2007). Only four rows from the front and right in the centre. It was excellent with above average legroom. Some people have commented that they couldn't always hear Richard Griffiths but I certainly had no problems where I sat and Daniel Radcliffe comes across loud and clear."

"E15: "Yes Prime Minister" (October 2010). For the £22.50 I paid it was an excellent seat; however the stage was quite high so it is probably worth sitting a couple of rows further back."

"E22 and 23: "Lend Me A Tenor: The Musical" (June 2011). These seats were great, and this heightened my experience."

"E23 and 24: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014). I should have compromised legroom for better view, but did the other way around instead. I opted for legroom comfort (I'm 6'2'') with seat E24 having nothing in front as mentioned. However, I feel we missed out too much with the view: the stage floor as well as the left stage wall. My opinion, especially for this show, is to go for seats in the dress our upper circle AND centred, to fully enjoyed the visual effects."

"F10 and 11: "The Audience" (March 2013), (Ann Cooper). Very central, but the man in front was tall so he blocked my view as the rake isn't very good here."

"F11 to 16: "Lend Me A Tenor: The Musical" (June 2011). Fairly close to the stage (row A removed due to the 'pit'). The stage seemed pretty high, I don't remember it being quite this high when seeing 'Avenue Q,' - but I was sat further back at that performance. I didn't suffer from any neck ache so it wasn't too bad. The rake seemed pretty non-existent, so can see why the stage would be higher. Comfortable seats in a lovely auditorium."

"Row G: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014). We had great seats, central and close to the stage. I really think this is a show to see from the stalls. Just my opinion, but you feel so much more involved from this position. It’s an intimate story. It helps if you can see the actors faces."

"G19 and 20: "Equus" (March 2007). At £22.50 with some offer. These were great seats, really close but without having to look up too much. The theatre felt really small, so even if you sat at the back of the stalls I think you’d still feel quite close to the stage."

"G19 and 20: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014). G19 gave a slightly better view of things as it seemed more offset to the seats in front and the view of the stage was for the most part clear. The rake isn’t great here, but I was able to just see over the taller gentleman's head who was sitting in front when I needed to see stage left. You can just about see the left hand side wall of the graph paper from these seats. The stage floor slopes towards the audience but you can’t really see what is happening, but I think for the most part what was drawn on the floor was replicated to the back screen. Seats were comfortable for the most part – only towards the end of the acts did I start to feel a bit fidgety; legroom OK as well for this 5 foot 10 inch theatregoer."

"G 6 and 7: "Hair" (April 2010). Good uninterrupted view and ample legroom."

"G17 and 18: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). I thought the seats probably were 1 or 2 rows too close to the stage. Legroom was sufficient, nothing more. It was difficult to see that Christopher was laying a railway track on the stage. I would say that you need to sit close to the stage as the actors are unmiked."

“Row K: "Hair," (Taljaard). We had seats on the front row of the Grand Circle and were all moved to row K in the stalls. The (new) seats were fine."

"K6 to 8: "The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg" (March 2011), (James – regular reader). Got them at a discount, making them fantastic value, considering they’re next to the premium seats. Good view and sound from here."

"K15 and 16: "The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg" (March 2011), (James – regular reader). The rake is okay here, although I was lucky not to have anyone in front - as I may have struggled otherwise. The sound is great from here. A bit steep at premium price though but good if at regular price, or less / Second visit:

"K18 and K19: “Lend Me A Tenor” (June 2011), (James – regular reader). Very fair at discount price."

"Row L: "Strangers On A Train" (November 2013), (Lordship Theatregoers). One major problem was that we couldn’t hear some of the dialogue, especially, Laurence Fox, although we sat in row L. I can’t imagine what it must have been like further back. This problem was made worse by the noisy projector but even this can’t be blamed for lack of voice projection – maybe a sign of lack of experience on the West End stage compared to TV work."

"L6: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). I got this as a "day seat" for £15 in October 2014, and it was right behind a premium seat, so was excellent - a great view of the stage."

"L15 and 16: The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg" (March 2011), (James – regular reader). perfect!"

"N7 to 9: (Rupi – regular reader). Great seats, but if I was being really fussy, I'd like to be a little further forward."

“N12 and 13: “The Audience,” (Chris B). Centrally located seats about halfway back in the stalls, these seats offer a fantastic clear view of the whole stage. There is a good rake so you can easily see over the heads in front. The seats are close enough to the stage to really feel part of the atmosphere. There is plenty of legroom too which is always nice.”

"N13: "The Ladykillers" (December 2011), (James – regular reader). Perfect seat. A good place to take in the whole stage and also far enough back to avoid craning your neck as a lot of action takes place higher than the main stage level."

"N14: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014): Perfect distance, central and good rake. Worth the price.

"N17: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In the Night Time" (August 2014). Mini spoiler - pick a prime number seat! Great view from N17. As other monkey followers have suggested, it's worth being in the latter two thirds of the stalls rows to get all the tech effects on stage. Don't forget to hang on after the curtain call!"

"P7: "Umbrellas Of Cherbourg" (March 2011). Offered a really good and clear view, and the overhang didn't obstruct my view at all, highly recommend."

"Row Q: "Chariots of Fire" (July 2012). The view is very good."

"Q 3, 4, 5 and 6: “Hair” (April 2010). They were actually pretty good seats, we were under the overhang of the circle but you could still see everything and it felt really close. I sat in Q3 and I didn't lose anything from being to the side. Leg room was fine, my friend who's 6 foot whatever didn't complain."

"Q7 and 8: "The Ladykillers" (December 2011). There is a good view of the amazing set. Ideally I would have liked to be a two or three rows forward to be able to see the top tip of the house that is cut off by the overhang of the circle, and to perhaps the faces of the actors a little more clearly. Personally I did miss a few words of dialogue that I might have heard from further forward but this was usually just due to audience laughter. The legroom was sufficient for someone of my size just over 6 foot and being a little further back in the stalls there is a reasonable rake that helps you see over the head of the people in the rows ahead."

"R 5 to 8: "Avenue Q" (June 2009). Although 18 rows back, I normally prefer to sit near the stage then this. However you do not feel that far away from the action. Can be a bit of a problem if any action is going on above stage level, this is because the overhang from the Dress Circle blocks the view of the top of the stage. However these seats offer plenty of legroom which is vital for any West End show."

"R6 and 7: "Avenue Q" (June 2009). Towards the back and just slightly off centre - but not a problem for any part of this show I think. The seats themselves I found to be very comfortable and being over 6' I also had plenty of knee room which was great, the seats look pretty new too. It certainly seems to have been well thought out which makes a change."

"Row S: "The Audience" (March 2013). The view was fine, but I would suggest a few rows further forward would be even better."

"S1 to S4: "Hair" (April 2010), (James – regular reader). The view was adequate from here. You do lose the top of the stage and the extreme right of it due to the overhang and being at the side, but for “Hair” at least, it doesn’t lose any important action. Good sound from here too. However, for distance from the stage, a bit pricey at £65."

Row T: "Avenue Q" (June 2009), (Graham). Sat in stalls row T, leg room is good (I'm 6ft) but the row is far enough back the circle above blocks the view a couple of times when the top of the set is used. I can't see how row S commands a higher price as it would have the same issue.

Sound quality is not as good as it could have been. Unlike another reviewer, I found the volume was plenty high enough. But the vocals lack clarity, sounding muffled. Ts and Ps are especially hard to pick out making the lyrics of some songs tricky to follow. Amateur-quality sound engineering in a professional music show is a big disappointment."

"Rows W and V: "Strangers on a Train" (December 2013). These rows to do not give a full view of the stage due to the overhanging balcony so you will only see the actors feet sometimes! The set is effectively two storeys."

"Row W (off centre): (Jos). The seats afforded a pretty good view of the stage...Oh and theatre monkey were spot on in their review of the seating and the theatre!"

 

Stalls Boxes

Layout:
A and C at the sides of the theatre beside the stage about dress circle height.

Each box seats 3 people.

Legroom:
Good, as movable chairs are used.

Choosing Seats in General:
At top price they are poor value, second price not much better, but at a discount they may worth considering to obtain better than average legroom.

General Hazard Notes:
The restricted view eliminating the sides of the stage.

Changes for the current production:
Top price seats - expensive, as occupants may well find themselves peering forward to see the side of the stage and thus miss action.

Reader Comments:
None.
 


DRESS CIRCLE 

Layout:
A single block in the centre of the circle

Two short rows of "slips" in the space between the Dress Circle and stage boxes at the sides of the theatre.

Entrance doors are beside rows B and J.

The Upper Circle overhangs the Dress Circle at row C. This does not affect the view from any seat, though claustrophobics may find H and J a little less comfortable.

The rake is comparatively shallow by West End standards, feels the monkey.
 

Legroom:
Tolerable in all seats for all under around 5ft 9 inches, except in row A and the centre of row J, where the 5ft 7 monkey was only just comfortable.

Best in row B seats 5 and 30 with almost nothing in front, as well as B 4 and 31 which have a little space for one leg thanks to the curve of the venue and seat position. C5 and 28 gain a little from being curved back a bit too.

Slip seats A 3, 6, 30 and 33 have least legroom - cramped for anyone 5ft 1 or taller. There's a bit more in A 4, 5, 31 and 32 where the circle wall curves away from the seats a bit. B3 and 32 also have a bit more as they are set back from the row in front.

Choosing Seats in General:
Oddly, the front of the circle feels almost at stage height, with the closest slip seats in row A almost within touching distance of the stage.

In the central block, rows B to D 13 to 23 are prime viewing, then the ends of these rows or the centres of either A or E according to taste for leg-space - a little less in A. The theatre are keen on the seats in the Dress Circle, and the monkey agrees.

At the extreme corners of the central block, a few seats in rows A to C have a slightly side view. The monkey rather likes those at the ends of B as they have a little extra legroom... For some productions, those same extreme end seats in rows A, B and C are cheaper. The monkey likes the end two in B particularly for a bit of extra space at a discount, if available - wheelchair users get priority; it always hopes the producers haven't re-priced them...!

Wheelchair users can choose from B 5 or 30, as both seats are replaceable with a chair place. Indeed, B31 can also be substituted too if need be... the monkey would take B30 first. B5 is on the same side of the theatre as the adapted toilet facility.

Further back, if the whole central Dress Circle is top price, the monkey would think twice about J for legroom, but for view the value is at least fair at second price it opines.


Slip Seats:
Row A seats 3 to 6 and 30 to 33, and B 3, 4, 31 and 32 are at the sides of the circle. The combination of tight legroom for the tall and needing to lean forward for a view says no for them the seats in row A, though seats 3 and 33 are within touching distance of the stage and the view is good without needing to lean forward too far. Behind, B 4 and 31 has over a third of the stage not visible - skip them unless there isn't another seat except row AA Upper Circle available (legroom there is tighter) and you REALLY, REALLY need to see about two-thirds of the show.

General Hazard Notes:
Lighting strapped to the circle front can affect views in rows A to D.

Poor legroom for the tall and views from slip seats.
 

Changes for the current production:

Most of rows A and B, plus C on Saturdays and "peak dates" are at "premium" prices. Monkey says OK for seats 13 to 23, though notes you can do very well in normal priced seats nearby; and legroom is better in the stalls for the taller, view better for the shorter from the circle. Seats further out are very over-priced at "premium" it thinks.

At "off peak" performances central rows C and D 13 to 23 very attractive, followed by B 23, the monkey feels. Outermost pairs of seats in F to H are second price. The monkey would take those in F first for a decent view, accepting you may not see the corner of the stage from here for a few moments.

Be aware that stalls premium seats are even more expensive than dress circle ones at some peak performances. If tall, pay more. If not, the dress circle has a better view of the stage floor, feels the monkey.

This theatre uses "Dynamic Pricing" meaning that some seat prices may increase depending on demand for a particular performance. The monkey considers that a "Green" seat would become "Light Green" and a "white" seat would become "red" if the price becomes "premium."

Extreme end seats in rows A, B and C are not discounted, alas. Say no more... particularly as the view is through a rail in the last four seats...

Row J is sold at second price, (except during "peak" and at Friday and Saturday performances, when it is top price). Monkey would skip it and choose similar priced (week) / cheaper (peak) more comfortable and closer to the stage seats at the front of the upper circle first.

Slip seats are very cheap for this production. Row B is the best combination of very low price and tolerable comfort for those under 5ft 7 or so. Think twice about A 4, 5, 31 or 32 as there are more comfortable seats with a better view in the upper circle to choose first. Some action happens on the side walls, though, which might not be easily seen from seats on the sides - a reader notes you lose everything happening on your own side, and doesn't recommend them at all.

Reader Comments:
"A15 and 16: I had a shock on the day, when I looked the the tickets and found I had paid a booking fee of about £50. How had that happened without my realising it? I had wondered how I had managed to get possibly the best seats in the house at a few weeks' notice.
As someone who walks with a stick, I found the journey down the vertiginous steps to my seat so terrifying that I refused to go to the bar at the interval even though there was a drink waiting for me. Never again will I sit in the front row: I really had the feeling I would tumble over the edge if I stood up."

"A16: At 6'1 tall, space a little cramped but certainly not uncomfortable."

“A30 and 31: “The Ladykillers,” (Chris B). These seats are in a small section curving round the dress circle on the left hand side. There are only four seats so it does feel special. However you have a side view of the stage and have to lean forward slightly, but the safety barrier is padded. In A30 I missed a small part of the far left of the stage (eg I missed Mrs Wilberforce's lavender dress) but nothing that's too important. But there is ample legroom. If you have the option choose A32 and 33 as you can be blocked further by people in those seats leaning too far forward. All these four seats are heavily discounted and are worth a shot.”

"A32: (Blithe Spirit): A32 Dress Circle for only £28 GBP. I had to lean slightly forward to see more of the action. But the price is reflective of this limitation, and I didn't mind. Dress circle is always my preference."

"A32 and 33: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). Front row of the Dress Circle, to the far left. I would not recommend these seats for this production. It was very hard/impossible to see the action on the left side of the stage, even with leaning forward. At the interval we moved to B26, 27 in the dress circle as they were empty. The view was much better there, albeit with slight difficulty in seeing the far left side of the stage (and very slightly obstructed view in B27 from the small barrier). If I had to do it again in this price range, I would have chosen further back but more central - the dress circle isn't that big."

“A32 and 33: “Chariots of Fire,” (Chris B). These seats are significantly cheaper than the rest of the top price dress circle, but in my opinion are definitely worth it. They are in a little section curved around the left of the circle, with only four seats it feels very private and exclusive. Because of the curve you are actually about level with the first and second rows of the stalls, so very close to the stage and all the action. These seats also give a great overview of the unique stage for Chariots of fire (a small running track with seats all round) and although you do have to lean forward slightly to see the extreme left of the stage, the safety barrier is padded and quite comfortable. As there is no one to your left either your view is not blocked any further and there is a nice space to store coats and bags. There is plenty of legroom too, and for the discount price these seats are a good deal.”

"A33: "The Audience" (March 2013). Seat for me at 5ft 6 was fine, legroom was ok and for this production I didn't have to lean too much as much of the play is centre stage. At £27 knowing people 4 seats along have paid £61 these are an absolute steal, and a decent view way above proportion of the price in comparison to other seats. I wouldn't hesitate in taking slips seats again here."

"Row B: (centre), (Mark). Good seat, got for £25 student standby. Much prefer the stalls for 'Avenue Q' though."

"B19 and 20: "Blithe Spirit" (March 2014). They were really comfortable seats with great legroom and an obviously fantastic view of the stage. Are seats worth £90 each? I still don't think so but then again I'm not a greedy producer!!"

"B26 and 27, C13 to 24 and E1 to 18: "The Ladykillers" (November 2011). All these seats had good leg room - even for those over 6' tall - and an excellent view of the stage. The rake is good, so there is no having to peer around the head of the person in front."

"B 26 and 27: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). We moved to B26 and 27 as they were empty. There is a slight difficulty in seeing the far left side of the stage (and very slightly obstructed view in B27 from the small barrier). If I had to do it again in this price range, I would have chosen further back but more central - the dress circle isn't that big."

C12 to 15: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2016). "Day Seats" at £15 each. Perfect seats. Could see all of the video projections on floor, all walls, and to the front of the stage. Got a pin for a name with a prime number."

"E 17 to 20: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). Good comfy seats and a really good view of the amazing show. But sitting in front of us in, I guess, 'premium priced' seats were 4 American tourists who seemed to treat the show like a baseball game. Much eating and Coke slurping; and in both halves of the show we had to ask them to refrain from leaning forward (why did they need to in 'Premium View' seats anyway?!) as our excellent view was otherwise obscured by their supersized frames."

"F12: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014).This was an enjoyable experience with sufficient legroom for a tall chap (6ft 2) and a good view of the stage."

"F15: "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night-Time" (June 2014). Very good view (perfect to see the floor)."




Dress Circle Boxes

Layout:
B and D are at the sides of the theatre, next to the stage between dress and upper circle height. Each box seats 3 people.

E, F and G are at the back of the dress circle, behind (and looking slightly down on) row J of the Dress Circle.

Originally intended to be partitioned into three, instead they are combined into a single plush "Royal Albert Hall" style box-space at the back of the Dress Circle, behind (and looking slightly down on) row J of the Dress Circle.

Here, fixed theatre seats are arranged in two rows. The front row has six centre seats, a gap, then four more seats either side of the central six. Behind the six central seats are another row of four seats raised up on a plinth. Fixed pillars lie at the front of the box area, between the three blocks of seats. They don't affect the sightlines in any way whatsoever, but enhance the exclusive "private room looking out into the theatre" atmosphere wonderfully.

Legroom:
Boxes B and D are fine, as movable chairs are used.

In E, F and G, it is adequate here for all but the tallest in the front row, but is very tight for those over 5ft 6 or so in the row behind.
 

Choosing Seats in General:
B and D offer an adequate viewing angle with only a little of the stage obscured. Worth considering at third price to obtain some legroom. Expensive above that, perhaps.

E, F and G: Though the very top of the stage isn't visible (and the monkey suspects, but can't test the theory that if the stage extends forwards those seated here may not quite see the front of it), the result is an interesting and exclusive viewing position. Indeed, the monkey hereby puts a bid in for use, come its next birthday celebration...
 

General Hazard Notes:
B and D miss nearside corner stage action.

E, F, and G will miss top of stage action, and may miss front of stage action, if the stage is extended.
 

Changes for the current production:
All top price, too expensive, feels the monkey, a long way back for the money, it feels.

Reader Comments:
"Box F: “The Ladykillers” (November 2011). Tickets are very expensive (like most London shows nowadays) but we took the Theatremonkey's advice and got £45 seats in Box F. This is actually a great little collection of seats because it's right at the back of the Dress Circe but with its own entrance, which makes it feel quite private. Visibility is as good as most of the Dress Circle, bearing in mind that the Upper Circle extends across a good deal of it. In this show you can see all the action on stage including a very novel depiction of the robbery. My only comment would be that my hearing is no longer in its prime, so I did have to listen very hard. If you've good hearing, go for these seats definitely."

F7 and F8: "Yes, Prime Minister" (October 2011). Refusing to pay over £80 each for front-row circle seats, we opted instead these at less than half the price. What a delight! We were the only people in the boxes, so we could spread out and relax. Entry is direct from the Dress Circle corridor, with no steps down to the seats: something I normally dread because I walk with a stick. There are large glass windows at the back of the boxes, but someone pulled curtains over them at lights-down, so we had total privacy. The view was fine. The very top of the scenery was lost, but that was hardly noticeable and didn't matter in any case. The front of the stage was lost if I slouched in my seat.

Beforehand, my main concern had been about the sound because my companion normally uses a non-inductive hearing-aid to give a slight boost to her hearing, but she had left that behind -which meant I could always blame her if she couldn't hear properly. The higher pitches tended to be lost so we had difficulty at times with the only female player and with the male with the highest-pitched voice, but for most of the time there were no problems although a bit of concentration was occasionally needed.

All of the front-row seats (E1 to 4, F5 to 10 and G11 to 14) seemed to be equally acceptable. But I'm not sure I would choose the second-row seats, F21 to F24, which seemed to have nothing going for them even without anyone sitting in front, and could only have been worse for sound and vision. If returning to the Gielgud, we would certainly choose these seats again."

 

UPPER CIRCLE
Called the
Grand Circle in this theatre.

Layout:
A quirk of architecture splits the circle into front and rear sections, with a low wall in front of row F marking the change.

At the very front edges of the circle are six “slip” seats either side of the central block.

The circle curves tightly round towards the stage.

The front block drops quite sharply downwards in front of it, while the rear block is shallower, but feels very high and far from the stage.

The front block has five long rows wrap around without an aisle.

Row E is slightly shorter, so there is nothing behind the end two seats in row D except a safety bar.

The rear section rows F to J are split into two blocks by a central aisle.
 

Legroom:
The front section is now equipped with high-backed seats (identical to those in the Novello Theatre Upper Circle) providing both comfort and extra legroom thanks to good design and installation.

Thanks to this new seating, legroom is OK  for those under 5ft 4 or so in row A and AA, though tight for everybody else.

Likely to be acceptably OK for those under 5ft 10 or so (one 6ft reader was fine in row B) in rows B and C - even moving towards comfortable for the 5ft 6 or so brigade,

Row D has less legroom, the outermost 4 seats the most cramped for those above 5ft 6 or so, innermost seats OK up to around 5ft 8.

Row E has the most legroom, those up to 5ft 9 and even taller should be very much OK.

Rear section seating is cramped in all seats from row F to J (and row F is the worst of these four rows), with the low wall using up some handy toe-space. On the other hand, without that wall the theatre might collapse, so on balance, the monkey guesses it has to stay...
 

Choosing Seats in General:
Front Section:
Centre rows C to E first is the monkey advice, though A and B are fair enough, it feels.

Prime seats in this section are row C 12 to 18, D and E 11 to 19 in the monkey view. Take D over C when it is cheaper and save bananas for the same view.

Then take the next two seats beside these, then either take something less central E (if it is cheaper), or central row B (if B to E are the same price), or consider row A if legroom isn't a factor.

After that, stick with C, D or E a bit further along within the price band.

Only the first and last two seats in all rows really have noticeable restricted views as the curve of the circle and box intrusions cut a fifteenth or so of the stage off - roughly the bottom corner nearest to them. In fact, the next two seats in from the "restricted view" ones may even be raised from "restricted view" status at some point, if a canny producer realises the potential... as they now have in row A. The theatre feels that the further back you go in the circle, the less the restrictions are noticeable.

Of restricted view seats, for comfort take those closest to the centre first, rows D, E, C, B, A in that order, and then repeat for the seats nearest the aisles. D has the best view but least legroom - though the end seats are wide enough to angle a leg into the aisle a bit.

For view G (or F if you can stand the legroom) then H and J are better than A to E, many feel. Note that these restricted view seats are normally the same price all the way back to J, but much more comfortable in the front section of seating.

The monkey would pick discounted front section seats over those behind first without hesitation for comfort - and the view isn't bad either, all things considered.

Rear Section:
The low wall in front of row F is only noticeable for the effect on legroom - it doesn't affect sightlines.

Views are quite clear from the rear section - though some feel it really does feel higher and further away from the stage than the rows in front (which mostly feel quite close - the monkey hopes that makes sense).

If this section, from row F back, are only tickets left: take seats as close as possible to the central aisle for both view and comfort, taking the most central seats available.

Usually, consider G or H first - whichever has the more central tickets left, then the next closest to the aisle in either row after that. Leave F unless you can get an aisle seat and don't mind sitting slightly sideways in it, in the monkey opinion.

Some productions have F to H at the same price as D and E... the monkey would skip them, and take J first as it is cheaper with similar view and (lack of) comfort.

Of the restricted view seats in this section, usually take seats 3 and 23 then 4 and 24 over the others, remembering to take row F last. The row H and J restricted view seats are the same price as those further forward, though, so take them after rows A to E but before F if legroom is an issue.

Side Slip seats:
Designated row AA, these are last pick of all, as you need to lean forward to see more than two-thirds of the stage. Take 5 to 8 first if you absolutely must, but be aware you get what you pay for... or even a bit less.
 

General Hazard Notes:
A bar runs across the front of the circle, which could affect the view in row A for the shortest - and could also bother the shortest people in the row behind too. It is double height at the aisles, which does mean those in the rear circle at the far ends have it in line.

A reader reports,
"Fair to say there is a rail at front of Grand Circle though doesn't obscure view even in front row where we sat."

A further safety rail exists at the ends of row D, meaning E 2 and 28 have it beside them. Not particularly in vision, the monkey felt, but worth knowing about if you are particularly picky.

The rear section rows F to J central aisle ends at an ornate gold rail. This doesn't affect the view from any seat, but may irritate purists.

Most off-centre seats lose a crescent shaped sliver of the front corner of the stage.

Slip seats are badly restricted and cramped.

Anybody leaning forward will restrict the view for those behind.

Changes for the current production:
At "off peak" Monday to Thursday performances, central rows C to E are cheaper than A and B, monkey likes - would take these before more expensive rows A and B. Take C first, then the most central seat available in D. Then choose between paying extra for B (also, if legroom isn’t a factor, consider row A) or take central row E or C and D a bit further along within the price band.

During "off peak" performances, rows A and B are just £27.50. The monkey likes B 13 to 19 very much, then.

Central rows F and G are the same price as row C to E seats in front. Avoid the lot, feels the monkey. Take G, then F last if there is nothing else left and you have to pay that price to see the show, it feels.

During Fridays, Saturdays and "peak" performances, central rows C to E are the same price as A and B. The monkey would still take C then D centre first, then B then E - always the most central seats available.

As for rows F and G, it would still skip F and probably go a row further back to H and save a few pounds on an identical view to G...

Rows H, J and the restricted view seats in rows A to G are a single price. Follow the usual rules about taking restricted view seats in the front section first. Then in the rear section, take the best available seats located closest to the front and centre aisle first, feels the monkey. Remember that row F has less legroom and that seats 1 to 4 and 23 to 26 in all rows have a restricted view, so take those in rows H and J last - you'll pay the same as those who are more central...

Row AA is the same price as restricted view seats in the centre block. Miss them, but if shorter than 5ft 4 or so they are about reasonable for the comfort and view you get - remembering you may miss seeing the stage walls. Taller, they are expensive at any price... Still, if desperate and related to Happy, Dopey etc, a possible, the monkey feels. Normal people should pay more unless they REALLY want to see the play and nothing else is left.

Reader Comments:
"Grand Circle" "The Curious Incident of the Dog In The Night Time" (February 2016). From my seat in the centre of the Grand Circle I had a good view of all but the extreme forestage, and for many of the stage effects the high viewpoint was a positive advantage. All but a very few ensemble lines were clearly audible."

"Row B 9 and 10: "Strangers on A Train" (November 2013). I would not particularly recommend these seats. Although the bar at the front didn't infringe on the view, the people in the seats on row A directly in front of us did - they kept leaning forward and at times I had a very narrow field of vision which was between them. Quite irritating! I would have much preferred the dress circle, but was unable to get tickets in that section. Also, I felt the sound wasn't as good as it could have been - I was straining to hear the dialogue at first but then I think my ears must have adjusted."

"Row B 15 and 16: "The Audience" (March 2013) "Graham." I was dubious about the Grand Circle (B15 and 16) visit as don't normally do 'top tier' but have to say what excellent seats these were. Dead centre and for a 6' bulk I had knee room to spare so disagree entirely about the 5'10" comment (an approximate advisory as always - editor). The view was great and could hear everything, wouldn't hesitate booking these again, a definite green seat from me I'm afraid. Wouldn't want to be in row A as tried that when everyone left and it was very tight on legroom."

"C 8 and 9: “Macbeth” (September 2007). Unfortunately we booked quite late so we didn't have much choice but found seats - which AREN'T in the restricted view area and wouldn't seem TOO far along from the seats which ought to be the best. So I thought these might be OK. I'm pretty used to sitting 'in the gods' so I don't expect an 'amazing view' but I thought these seats were some of the worst I've ever had, I think, principally because the curve of this circle seems quite exaggerated? I don't know, I've sat much higher up in other theatres and enjoyed a much better view.

From my calculations, C 8 and 9 are 4 or 5 along from the restricted view seats but they really don't warrant the £37.50 price. A good quarter of the near corner of the stage was obscured but when folk in row A lean forward (as they mostly do, because of the bar) this rises to about half the stage, even if you lean forward yourself. Effectively, we were only able to see the left-hand triangle as it were. Added to this, I think the leg-room and seat angle were pretty poor up here - it wasn't just us shuffling about. After the interval, we were able to move to C16-17, which hadn't been available at booking. All the stage was viewable from here, though leg-room is unchanged. Be aware that if you get someone with a big head in front of you in these rows of the upper circle, the rake isn't steep enough for you to see over them - and we're quite tall! I think, on balance, C16 and 17 were reasonable value for this price range but in future I wouldn't consider any seats beyond 12 and would, in preference go for a higher row. (The monkey would welcome further comment on this from other readers. It felt (having had another long look) that the restriction in fact feels greater than it actually is: while it seems like huge lumps of circle are cutting off the whole view, it felt the circle lines up pretty well with the very front of the stage, and you don't actually lose much of the playing area itself.).”

"C23 and C24": "Blithe Spirit" (March 2014). I  would usually avoid the third level of a West End theatre but needs must. At £29 + booking fee these are excellent value during the preview period. C23 and had a very clear view of the stage. I had good sightlines and was able to view everything without having to crane my neck. My partner sat in C24 however, and he found that the action that took place on the left hand side of the stage was obscured slightly and he missed some of the action. We had some good fortune in that two seats were empty in the row during the first act. Therefore during the interval everyone shuffled up a seat. I was therefore in C22 for the second act and my view was even better. My other half commented on the much better view he had in C23. I would say that the only issue was that the sound didn’t always carry, especially Dame Angela’s words. I did have to strain to hear all her dialogue. Legroom was ample and a particular comment should be made on the very comfortable seats which were clearly quite new."

“D5: Grand Circle. Restricted view. The restriction is felt. It is not negligible. The lady in front of me (C4) kept leaning forward ALL THE TIME. It was just too bad. I had to move my head around. Actually, I have been around a bunch of leaning people. At one point, they even stood!!! Leg room is just about acceptable. Considering the price, I probably go along with the Monkey’s assessment of this seat. (Bad manners never help, feels the monkey).”

“D5 and D6: “God of Carnage”. £15 each (preview prices for that production in 2008). The seats are OK for the price but it is restrictive view indeed.

We were lucky enough not to have anyone in the row in front for the first part, but then two latecomers joined and blocked our view, especially since these people kept on changing position in their seats and leaning forward and annoying everyone who had already settled down. We moved up and again were able to get empty seats in front (the ones we left). Personally I would not have wanted to pay the higher prices for a more central view but we were lucky there was some margin for keeping empty seats in front, otherwise the restrictive view would have really been annoying, at least in this show, which has only four people on stage. It is not the part that is really cut from your view (which may be behind the restrictive view classification), but that fact that if the rows in front are full, your view is really reduced. So my advice for this price range and this show would be to try and go in a less popular day so that there are free seats close to you and you can somehow ad! just your position. If other people's heads are going hinder the view, better go for a discounted price."

"D 10 and 11: “Hair”. The Monkey was totally right about these seats being the last ones in the section where you could really see the whole stage (the view was even better when I decided to move to the unoccupied D12 for the second act)."

"D18: "Blithe Spirit" (April 2014), (Lily). I had a full view of the stage, and felt the price for the seat was not bad. I am a very short person so legroom is rarely an issue for me anyway, and this theatre was no exception. I had no problem when it came to anyone in the rows in front blocking the view either."

“F7: At first I thought, woah I'm high (and the lady next to me was scared of the height). But once the play started the distance between me and the players didn't matter. I could hear and see everything. If you're in this section, it is best to be nearer the middle if possible. I thoroughly enjoyed the play and the seat was fine."
"F12 and F13: "Chariots of Fire" (June 2012). Offered a decent view of the stage. The whole stage was visible - there was just some parts at the very top of the set which weren't visible but that didn't cause any problem for this production."

G25 and 26: “Equus” (2007), (Marcus Chaplin). These were excellent value as they are sold as restricted view tickets but for "Equus" the area of the stage you can't see is very rarely used, it all focuses on the centre of the stage. Good seats if you're on a budget."

“G23 to 26: “Comedian Bill Bailey” (December 2008), (James). I thought the view was fine (the show was fantastic too). Once you first sit down you do seem to think it is fairly high, however once you get into the show you really don’t notice it at all, G26 and G25 (which I was in) has only the very side of the stage slightly, and I mean slightly, obscured by a rail but things are still visible and no problems at all. I would definitely recommend these seats as they are great value for money."

 

 

Notes
Total 973 seats.

Air-cooled auditorium. Not as effective as proper air conditioning, so be prepared for a hot and uncomfortable time in the height of summer, alas. To minimise the effects, seating in the front stalls is normally coolest as heat rises - and is also trapped in Circle overhangs. Just a bit of advice from someone in the theatre industry who has a grasp of physics...

Infrared headsets available working best in the front of each part of the auditorium (not good from Stalls row K back, though). Guide dog sitter available. Wheelchairs can replace seats B 5 and 30 in the Dress Circle. Access is via a fire exit and 12-cm step. Adapted toilet in foyer near the bar on the B5 side. Specific information from the theatre group dedicated phoneline on 0844 482 5137, www.delfontmackintosh.co.uk or Artsline 020 7388 2227 email artsline@dircon.co.uk. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

No food except Ice-cream and confectionery. Bar snacks also available.

Three bars, Foyer, Stalls and Dress Circle. Reader Barfly noted that the Stalls one is, "nicely tucked away, meaning that it wasn't too crowded."

A VIP room leading off from a corridor behind the Dress Circle is available for hire.

8 toilets in all; Stalls 1 gents 1 cubicle, 2 ladies 6 cubicles, 4 cubicles; Dress Circle 1 gents 3 cubicles, 1 ladies 4 cubicles; Upper Circle 1 gents 2 cubicles, 2 ladies 2 cubicles each.

Reader Sam notes in November 2005 that:
"As a female I wanted to let others know that the toilets are just outside the stalls and not once (in the three times I used it) did I have to wait on line. That was the best part of the show!"

Another, in 2008 adds,
"the Gielgud has the nicest women's toilets of any theatre I've ever been to. As so many theatre toilets, especially in the West End, are so very skanky I thought it was something worth remarking on. Plenty of cubicles, room to queue (not that it's needed as there are plenty of cubicles), nice smelling soap, space to move around and not get stuck in the loo, pretty wallpaper and all very very clean."
 

A reader says of upstairs facilities,
"The ladies' loos in the Upper Circle are more cramped (if that's possible!) than the seating - literally no room to turn round - or to let people in and out!"

One reader notes that latecomers may have to watch part of the performance on a TV in the foyer. He found this rather a noisy location, alas, and wishes to warn others of the potential problem.

In 2014 a reader noted that the cloakroom charges £1 per item stored.

PLEASE NOTE: For copyright reasons, information and graphics on this page should not be directly copied and reproduced on other websites / noticeboards. Hyperlinks to this page are, of course, welcomed. 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Piccadilly Circus - Piccadilly (Dark Blue) and Bakerloo (Brown) lines.

The escalator from the platforms ends in a large circular underground area. 

After leaving the barriers, turn to your left, and follow the curve of the barriers around until you see an exit to your right with the sign "Subway 4" over it. Walk under this sign.

Walk through this tunnel and take the first staircase to your right, marked "Shaftesbury Avenue", take the stairs up to the street.

At the top of the stairs, take a very sharp "U Turn" through 180 degrees to your left. Look forwards and upwards for the huge "Sanyo" sign. Walk forwards towards it.

The busy road to your left is Shaftesbury Avenue. If you see the Prince of Wales Theatre, and Trocadero centre, wrong way.

For the Gielgud Theatre cross the road and turn to your right, walk under the covered area where the cash ATM's and street artists are. Walk straight on, crossing Denman Street, Great Windmill Street, Archer Street and Wardour Street and past the Lyric and Apollo Theatres. The Gielgud is the next one beyond these.

 

Buses:
14, 19, 22B, 38, 53, 88, 94, 159 To Shaftesbury Avenue.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Best chance of hailing one is in the street outside.

 

Car Park:
Shaftesbury Avenue. Cross the road, turn left, passing the Curzon West End Cinema, and Queens Theatre and crossing Greek Street, Firth Street, Dean Street and Wardour Street. The theatre is on your right. If you come to the Palace Theatre, wrong way.

The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available at this car park. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 24 hours using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

For a full list of car parks and theatres that participate in the 50% off theatreland scheme see http://www.q-park.co.uk.

 

Denman Street is an alternative - NOT in the above scheme, though. Turn to your left as you leave the car park. If you see the Piccadilly Theatre, wrong way. Walk to the end of the street and turn left. Walk straight on, crossing Great Windmill Street, Archer Street and Wardour Street and past the Lyric and Apollo Theatres. The Gielgud is the next one beyond these.

PLEASE NOTE: For copyright reasons, information and graphics on this page should not be directly copied and reproduced on other websites / noticeboards. Hyperlinks to this page are, of course, welcomed. 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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