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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

DUCHESS THEATRE

 

 

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG (comedy)


Old Red Lion Theatre and Mischief Theatre present new comic writing from the producer of Mercury Fur finds the inept Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society staging a 1920’s murder mystery

Forgotten lines, inept actors and a set with its screws loose form the heart of this fast-paced, celebrated new comedy, which transfers to the West End direct from an acclaimed run at the Old Red Lion Theatre earlier this year.

Focusing on the many trials and tribulations of the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society, the play tells the story of the company’s staging of 1920’s murder mystery Murder at Haversham Manor. Chris the arrogant head of the drama society has directed the piece and cast himself as the dynamic Inspector, while desperate wannabe actress Sandra and the genuinely doting Max struggle opposite each other as the romantic interests and actor Dennis still can’t pronounce “façade”. An hour of delicately timed disaster ensues; actors get knocked out, the play gets stuck on a loop and the set starts to disintegrate.

The production’s third run on the West End Stage signals underlines the latest in a series of transfers from the Old Red Lion, which develops bold, dynamic and innovative theatre, providing a space where work is created and seen first.

 "How To: Get Out Of Awkward Situations" a guide by "The Play That Goes Wrong," in association with TKTS:



www.mischieftheatre.co.uk / @mischiefimpro / #theplaythatgoeswrong are the websites.

 

The tour runs until until 5 August 2017. See www.theplaythatgoeswrong.com, Twitter: @playgoeswrong Facebook: The Play That Goes Wrong for detials.

 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

(Seen at the afternoon performance on 26th July 2015) Some actors have now left the cast.
It took the monkey over a year to get around to this - and it is pleased it did - managing to catch much of the original cast before they disperse to other projects.

That the play is the product of graduating drama students "doing it for themselves" and ending up, through numerous versions and presentations, with a full-length show backed by a major producer is an achievement. It also means that their frame-of-reference for its creation matches directly the situation they attempt to create. Students writing about a 'student dramatic society' means that emotionally, the whole thing feels genuine even as every artificially created comedic idea unfolds.


And that is the true strength of the show. Fans of 1970s sitcoms will recognise every element of slapstick, every scrape and "Fawlty" moment - and still, because the show is so truthful, laugh like drains. Better, every performance is slightly different (a third-time visitor informed the monkey that one particularly wonderful "pantomime" moment has never happened before), and if the show has been running a year, it still feels as fresh as the first night it portrays.


Some wonderful performances from Adam Byron as Trevor the indolent Lighting and Sound Man, Rob Falconer as a cheery Max Bennett, Henry Shields as Chris Bean - effortlessly improvising from audience reaction; plus rubber-faced, exquisitely expressive Nancy Wallinger as Annie Twilloil are the highlights of a cast who work tirelessly to ensure nothing goes right.

Yes, the play itself could do with a little more structure towards the end, and just occasionally a little time to allow the audience to rest before the next joke (and also, perhaps, the odd deletion of repeating a fairly flat joke twice). For the most part, though, it zips along, laughs piling up and honouring the finest traditions of "Noises Off" and "No Sex Please, We're British" to name but two.

It's not going to please everybody. Those seeing sophisticated word-play should look elsewhere; but after a hard day at work it requires little effort to love this manic group of young hopefuls, and should delight the Great British crowd. The monkey for sure will be back to see it again some time, and only wishes it had caught the show sooner.

 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

(12 reviews)

Seats.
Stalls L27 and L28. End of row, restricted view. VERY restricted I would say, although I have never tried them before. There was an awful lot that couldn't be seen, not just a 5 minute scene as implied by Theatremonkey. (All seats have variable views - editor).

Play.
Zzzzzzzzzz. The woman howling with laughter behind me, even when she couldn't see what was going on, sums it up nicely from my point of view. So glad I had cheap seats near the back for a quick exit.
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I'm not a fan of farces, but I went to see this play because a few years ago I saw a memorable performance where everything really did go wrong... and I was interested to see how a play compared to the real thing.

Well, all I can say is that schadenfreude is a terrible thing; but it was wonderful to be able to laugh out loud at the disasters befalling the actors - and my friend and I laughed from beginning to end. In fact, the only people who didn't seem to be laughing sat next to my friend and she could hear them complaining about fluffed lines and the poor set etc....did they know what the play was about?

We were lucky to get discounted tickets (£20 each) for prime seats (row G in the stalls) and it was the best £20 I have spent in a very very long time. I can't recommend this play enough; it isn't deep and meaningful and it won't have you joining in long and thoughtful discussions about its subject matter - but it will really cheer you up.

Mary.
________________________________________________

Saturday 28th February 2015.

Dress Circle B15 and 16. Not ever been to this theatre before and thought it was really lovely. Not a large venue but big enough to create a great atmosphere. The circle is very well raked and the seats we sat in were very comfortable with very good legroom indeed and a very good view of the stage. .. they come highly recommended!

The show was excellent with such brilliant performances from the entire cast! The theatre was packed and everyone was in hysterics. I know that farce/slapstick isn't for everyone but if you liked 'noises off/faulty towers' or have an appreciation of amateur dramatics or just love an incredible laugh you will love this show... SPOILER ALERT I won't give away too much but the show really does start before curtain up and we bumped into one of the cast at the bar.. (get there early). SPOILER ENDS.

Some have criticised the going from one act play to two acts but I really don't think it matters... the only slight criticism I have is that towards the end it all gets very manic with everyone shouting and doing their thing as the whole thing collapses around them... that could of been done with slightly more finesse but it's only an observation and nothing else.

Truly loved it and can't wait to go back and see it again!!

Graham.
________________________________________________

Just went to see 'The Play That Goes Wrong' in the Duchess Theatre today (19th April 2015). It's my second time watching it - still very funny!

My friend and I sat at Stall C3 and C4 - excellent view. At first we thought seat number 3 and 4 would offer a side view, but there are fewer seats in the front rows. Just for comparison, C3 and C4 are at the same position as, say, F6 and F7. [spoiler alert!] Since we are almost level with the stage, we missed less than 1% of the act when an actress fainted behind the sofa. I wouldn't worry about that at all, as you can still figure out what happened in that scene. [spoiler ends]. In summary, these seats offer brilliant views!
________________________________________________

The Play That Goes Wrong is supposedly performed by an AmDram company, who (they believe) have finally found a production within their scope.

They could not be more wrong. One disaster follows another, with hilarious after-effects.

The first half is where the most gut-achingly funny gags occur, as props fail, lines go wrong actors have mishaps, all leading towards (and often combining to create) even bigger gags and laughs. There were times I was in genuine pain; struggling to get my breath and just wanting a gap in the action to regain my composure. And failing completely.

The second half is perhaps not as funny as the first, being more reliant on physical comedy. It is also the home of the one joke that falls flat (mainly through over-repetition). Don’t get me wrong, it is still laugh out loud funny, but just not at the level that makes you feel your inside is going to burst like the first. Though there is a trick performed in this half that I have no idea how they pulled it off.

Two important things: 1. Get there early. There are things going on before the show that you might not realise are going on, but they slip into the show as it develops. Same thing during the interval. 2. Buy a programme. I always get one, but understand others don’t. But in this case, buy one as it joins in with the joke and forms additional jokes that enhance the show!

This show gets rave reviews, and for good reason. If you want a laugh, buy a ticket and go along. You will come out hurting, but for good reason.

Bob Pickett.
________________________________________________

For the first time in a very long while I’ve left the theatre feeling distinctly underwhelmed and somewhat cheated. This feels very much a late night student review at The Fringe rather than a fully-fledged West End show. The place was pretty packed and there was continual laughter - though the people in front of us didn’t reappear for the second half – but ultimately it falls flat.

Simple conceit - the cast get through the play and everyone / everything falls apart – completely. That’s it. Essentially 'Noises Off' without the story line, characterisation and the rest.

The cast aren’t bad, but I’ve seen better physical comedy - think 'One Man Two G’uvnors.' Had they condensed this into a one hour, one act show (which is where it started) we would have left on a high. If you like slapstick then you’ll like this - my companion was in danger of an asthma attack but, by mid-way through the second act, even he was breathing normally.

Seats E1 and 2 were OK – decent leg room (but not as good as the end of F behind) but there’s virtually no rake so neck was feeling cricked. Cheers for Nica Burns and her loo refit (maybe she really understands) – always grateful to her!
________________________________________________

Just come back from this (12th July 2015) and it was worth missing the live transmission of the Wimbledon final (although I'm now about to watch the recording, having carefully avoided finding out who won….).

This is a glorious two hours of total nonsense, brilliantly delivered by a cast who are clearly enjoying themselves as much as the audience. If the Reduced Shakespeare Company was your idea of entertainment, you are almost guaranteed to find this just as much fun. Timing is everything, but a stage full of props which don't do what they should helps things along, too! Forget the deep, meaningful plays acted by by committed, sensitive actors with an insight into complex, repressed characters: this is just laugh-out-loud funny. Minimum suggested 8 is age and that's probably about right – the slapstick had the children in the audience in stitches.

We sat in Stalls C7, 8 , 9 and 10. Comfortable seats with a superb view (heights ranged from 5' 2" to 5' 11") and plenty of leg room. Be warned: the seats are lower than you might expect, which makes sitting down and getting up again a slight challenge for those of a less nimble disposition. No big deal, but just be aware of it if anyone in your party has real trouble with seat heights which are below average.
________________________________________________

16th August 2015.

One of the few plays on a Sunday evening. Sat in stalls M17. Since the theatre is rather small I had a good view. Legroom is not great, but adequate (once again, I’m 6’2’’). After the interval I switched to empty seat L15. Heaven! I had two armrests for myself (L16 was also empty) and I could blissfully move my leg into the aisle. So if you can, get an aisle seat in row K or M.

If I were mean I could dub “The Play That Goes Wrong” “The Play That Tries To Hard”. They throw everything at the audience, but not all of it sticks. To be fair, the audience was howling with laughter (sometimes annoyingly so), and I had some laugh-out-loud moments to, as well as many chuckles, but I felt, a little more structure, a little more time to let the good jokes breathe, would go a long way. A perfect example for that would be “Noises Off!”which I find superior in every regard. But I don’t want to sound too negative. There’s a lot to like, and the enthusiasm of the actors is quite infectious.
________________________________________________

At night on 31st October 2015, we made our first visit to the Duchess Theatre for "The Play That Goes Wrong". Found this play to be hilarious mayhem from start to finish - it's a bit like the theatrical equivalent of Airplane - it's relentlessly silly and the jokes come so thick and fast that they don't all hit, but that doesn't matter.

Superbly played by a talented cast, how they are not consistently maimed is beyond me. This will not be for everyone, if you like your humour suave, sophisticated and cleverly witty, then stay away. But if you are prepared to be swept away with the sheer deftness of it all then it's unmissable.

We sat in the stalls, row C, seats 8 and 9. I totally agree with what is already on your site - perfect view apart from what goes on behind the sofa, we thought they were excellent - except for (as already stated) they are so low! Folding my 6'5" frame in was a challenge in itself, and once in I couldn't move, my knees were pressed up against the back of the chair in front, and became extremely painful by the end of each act. It's a good job the play was so entertaining! So I advise caution to those of a similar stature.
_______________________________________________

Saw this at the matinee on 6th February 2016. Utterly brilliant. I laughed so hard I thought I might need an ambulance! This play should have a government health warning!

As I was just passing time whilst I waited for my daughter, who was at a convention elsewhere in London, I booked a restricted view seat to save money... and what a bargain it turned out to be. Just £19 for seat F22 in the stalls. End of the row, no seat in front so endless legroom ( in fact I could have laid on the floor and not disturbed anyone ! ) and a great view. There is a fireplace stage left which cannot be seen from this seat so I guess I missed a few fireplace related jokes. Made no difference to me....I missed loads more jokes simply because I was crying with laughter and gasping for breath!

A great show, lovely theatre, highly recommended. Lets hope it runs for years and that they never find the dog.....!
_______________________________________________

 We had read some reviews about the production which were very positive and several of my friends raved about how funny it was.

So I guess our expectations were high as we sat in the stalls (L17 and 18 as recommended on Theatre Monkey) and were surprised at how small the Duchess Theatre was.

The play starts almost the moment you sit in your seat, there is interaction with the audience (I won't spoil it for readers) and some laughs.

Once it starts the pace quickens and you really do need to watch every moment to catch the crazy, daft antics along with the impeccable timing of the cast.

Every one of the (relatively) small cast performed brilliantly, playing their part perfectly and the laughter filled the room. They responded to the audience, plenty of improvisation I suspect, although it's hard to tell!

The set is very clever, again I will not spoil it, but just to say the set is a big part of the performance.

Highly recommend this play. Buy a ticket for hilarious madness!
_________________________________________________

Thanks again for your help with seats, this time for the Duchess Theatre.

Stalls G24 (Restricted view) - hold the front page: plenty of leg room in London Theatre! And a goodish view of most of the stage; and all for £20.

It's's not all good news though as there was no description of what the restricted view was and it turned out, for this play, that it was quite significant. Many of the visual gags on the left of the stage were hidden.

Still, an amusing way to spend a midweek evening.

Yorkshire Monkey





 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Tuesday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm
Sunday at 3pm and 7pm
NO MONDAY AND TUESDAY PERFORMANCES.

Runs 2 hours 5 minutes approximately.


 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form when available.

Until 10th September 2017
All "off peak" date performances:

Stalls:
Rows A to O: £44.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row E 5 to 14, F 7 to 16, G and H 8 to 17 and J 9 to 18: £65
Restricted  view seats rows F to M and O 1, 2; N 2; L 25, 26; M 26, 27; O 26, 27: £35
Restricted view seats row F21, 22; G 23, 24; H 24, 25; J 25, 26; K 25, 26; L and N 27, 28; M and O 28, 29: £20

Dress Circle:
Rows A to D, plus E and F 5 to 16: £44.50
Rows E and F 1 to 4 and 17 to 20, plus G and H 5 to 16: £35
Rows G and H 1 to 4 and 17 to 20 and J: £20

Boxes:
B, C and F: £35 per seat if sold.

 

 

All "peak date" performances:
Stalls
Rows A to O: £49.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row E 5 to 14, F 7 to 16, G and H 8 to 17 and J 9 to 18: £65
Restricted view seats rows F to M and O 1, 2; N 2; L 25, 26; M 26, 27; O 26, 27: £35
Restricted view seats row F21, 22; G 23, 24; H 24, 25; J 25, 26; K 25, 26; L and N 27, 28; M and O 28, 29: £20

Dress Circle:
Rows A to D, plus E and F 5 to 16: £49.50
Rows E and F 1 to 4 and 17 to 20, plus G and H 5 to 16: £35
Rows G and H 1 to 4 and 17 to 20 and J: £20

Boxes:
B, C and F: £35 per seat if sold.

 




From 12th September 2017
All "off peak" date performances:

Stalls:
Rows A to O: £46.50 except:
"Premium Seats" row E 5 to 14, F 7 to 16, G and H 8 to 17 and J 9 to 18: £65
Restricted  view seats rows F to M and O 1, 2; N 2; L 25, 26; M 26, 27; O 26, 27: £36.50
Restricted view seats row F21, 22; G 23, 24; H 24, 25; J 25, 26; K 25, 26; L and N 27, 28; M and O 28, 29: £20

Dress Circle:
Rows A to D, plus E and F 5 to 16: £46.50
Rows E and F 1 to 4 and 17 to 20, plus G and H 5 to 16: £36.50
Rows G and H 1 to 4 and 17 to 20 and J: £20

Boxes:
B, C and F: £36.50 per seat if sold.

 

 

All "peak date" performances:
Stalls
Rows A to O: £55 except:
"Premium Seats" row E 5 to 14, F 7 to 16, G and H 8 to 17 and J 9 to 18: £69.50
Restricted view seats rows F to M and O 1, 2; N 2; L 25, 26; M 26, 27; O 26, 27: £39.50
Restricted view seats row F21, 22; G 23, 24; H 24, 25; J 25, 26; K 25, 26; L and N 27, 28; M and O 28, 29: £20

Dress Circle:
Rows A to D, plus E and F 5 to 16: £55
Rows E and F 1 to 4 and 17 to 20, plus G and H 5 to 16: £39.50
Rows G and H 1 to 4 and 17 to 20 and J: £20

Boxes:
B, C and F: £39.50 per seat if sold.

 

 

First 100 seats sold for all Sunday performances are £25 (£29.50 "peak" dates), with no booking fee, via the www.nimaxtheatres.com website or 0844 482 9672 only.

See the show three times, collect stamps on your loyalty card, and get a free ticket: http://www.theplaythatgoeswrong.com/tickets/loyalty-card


Some details may change, the monkey will update when available.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.nimaxtheatres.com
 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
Until 10th September 2017: £2 on £65, £49.50, £44.50 and £35, £1.50 on £20 seats, per ticket.
From 12th September 2017: £2.50 on all seats, except £2 on £20 seats, per ticket.


 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

When the box office does not have what you require, the Theatremonkey Ticketshop telephone 020 7420 9778 (0044 207 420 9778 if calling from outside the United Kingdom), offers an extra selection of £49.50 seats with an £8.50 (£11.25 on £65, £7.60 on £44.50, £6 on £35, £3.40 on £20 tickets) per ticket booking fee until 10th September 2017 / £46.50 seats with an £8 (£11.25 on £65, £6.25 on £36.50, £3.50 on £20 tickets / £11.50 on £69.50, £9.50 on £55, £7 on £39.50, £3.50 on £20 "peak date" seats) per ticket booking fee from 12th September 2017 onwards. Slightly higher than the box office, but lower than most agencies. Worth checking if the box office cannot provide the exact tickets you might require. Note that this system will confirm exact seat numbers prior to purchase. A £1.95 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee may apply on some transactions by telephone. NO handling fee applies for online purchases.

www.seetickets.com / telephone 0870 830 0200 (FREE call if using BT.com Calling Plan at your chosen times) which offers £49.50 seats with a £7.42 (£9.75 on £65, £6.67 on £44.50, £5.25 on £35, £3 on £20 tickets) per ticket booking fee until 10th September 2017 / £46.50 seats with a £6.97 (£9.75 on £65, £5.47 on £36.50, £3 on £20 tickets / £10.42 on £69.50, £8.25 on £55, £5.92 on £39.50, £3 on £20 "peak date" seats) per ticket booking fee from 12th September 2017 onwards. A £2.75 per booking, not per ticket, handling fee also applies.

www.ticketmaster.co.uk offer £49.50 seats with a £5.45 (£9.75 on £65, £4.90 on £44.50, £3.85 on £35, £2.20 on £20 tickets) per ticket booking fee until 10th September 2017 / £46.50 seats with a £7 (£9.75 on £65, £5.50 on £36.50, £3 on £20 tickets / £10.50 on £69.50, £8.25 on £55, £6 on £39.50, £3 on £20 "peak date" seats) per ticket booking fee from 12th September 2017 onwards, and a £2.95 per booking, not per ticket, postage fee if required and time allows / £1 for box office collection option / no fee for print at home tickets. The site also allows you to select your own seats from those it has available.

Encore Tickets (telephone 0207 400 1253 / 0044 207 400 1253 if calling from outside the United Kingdom) offer £49.50 seats with an £14.50 (£19 on £65, £12 on £44.50, £10 on £35, £6 on £20 tickets) until 10th September 2017 / £46.50 seats with a £13.50 (£19 on £65, £10.50 on £36.50, £6 on £20 tickets / £19.50 on £69.50, £16 on £55, £11.50 on £39.50, £6 on £20 "peak date" seats) per ticket booking fee from 12th September 2017 onwards booking fee per ticket. A postage charge of £1.45 per booking, not per ticket may be applied to bookings made from UK addresses more than 5 days before the performance. The "Flexiticket" Exchange Service, allowing FREE transfer / cancellation (credit note up to 12 months) of your booking up to 3 days before the performance is also available for £1.99 per ticket. Discounts and "Meal and Show" packages may also be available. Quality and Value Quality and Value hotel / theatre ticket packages are also available.

Londontheatredirect.com offer £49.50 seats with a £10 (£13 on £65, £9 on £44.50, £7 on £35, £4 on £20 tickets) until 10th September 2017 / £46.50 seats with a £9.25 (£13 on £65, £7.25 on £36.50, £4 on £20 tickets / £14 on £69.50, £6.75 on £55, £8 on £39.50, £4 on £20 "peak date" seats) per ticket booking fee from 12th September 2017 onwards booking fee per ticket. There is a £1 per booking, not per ticket, transaction fee for collecting tickets from the box office before your performance. Alternatively, if time allows, there is a postage to your home option, costing £2.95 (£4.95 to non-UK addresses) per booking, not per ticket. Optional Ticket Insurance is also available. Discounts and Meal and Show Packages may also be available.



ALSO SEE Tickettree.com for great value "hotel and theatre ticket" packages.

Other Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.

 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0330 333 4810
Operated by Quay Tickets Agency 9am to 9pm daily, on behalf of the venue from 9am to 9pm daily. Outside these hours, See Tickets can sell seats on 0870 830 0200. Booking fees will apply on their number.

 

 

Booking fees per ticket for telephone bookings:
Until 10th September 2017: £2 on £65, £49.50, £44.50 and £35, £1.50 on £20 seats, per ticket.
From 12th September 2017: £2.50 on all seats, except £2 on £20 seats, per ticket.

 

 

For personal callers or by post: Catherine Street, London. WC2B 5LA
No booking fee for personal callers.

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Notes
STALLS 

Layout:
Rows A to F are a single block curved in front of the stage.

The stalls are very narrow with the longest row only 29 seats.

For most productions, an centre aisle divides seats from row G to the back of the theatre.

For a few shows, mostly musicals, extra seats are installed in the centre aisle of rows G, H and J. In that case, the centre aisle runs from row K back.

The rake
(sloped floor to help see over rows in front) in this theatre begins at row G.

The Dress Circle overhangs the stalls at row G.

Legroom:
Best in central row A, average in rows B to F (F 1 and 21 have more), better in rows G to O - one taller person remarks a bit cramped even there, though.

Centre aisle seats are available in row G (K for some productions) back allowing extra comfort along with a good view.

Seats are quite low, so be careful if tall, as the sitting position is a little odd.

Choosing Seats in General:
It is normally worth avoiding the first and last four seats in rows A to E as their proximity to the stage and angle at which the row curves in towards the centre makes viewing the rear corner of the stage hard. If you are handing over good banana money the least one expects is to see the LOT

Those in row A and B in particular may look sharply up at the stage when it is high - some may wish to avoid neck ache and sit further back. The backs of seats in row A are also sloped back slightly to improve viewing angles.

If row A is cheaper, the monkey would pick seats 5 to 10 first, and notes that usually the way the show is staged sitting here and looking up may lose a little of the back / top of the stage at times.

If you are paying full price, row G is prime, then try H and J. Forward of these rows the view is fine, provided the person in front is short.

The view from the back rows is good enough to rate these seats value for your money too. For musicals the monkey might avoid N 9 and 10, O 9 and M 11 to 14 for being close to a sound desk, though.

Most productions have row N cheaper than row O - you get the same view for less one row back. Row O is OK, but sitting there it'd be hard not to feel a little hard-done-by knowing the seats in front are closer to the stage for the same cash, feels the monkey.

Row N Wheelchair users have a reasonable view from spaces at the ends of row N.

Don't bother with restricted view row N 1 and 29 - the saving is not worthwhile as you can have a decent seat only a little further back for the same or less money.

General Hazard Notes:
When the stage is high, rows A and B are a neck-ache experience.

Extreme ends of rows A to E miss nearside rear-corner stage action.

The very top of the set is not visible from row M back.

Pillars at the ends of row N make seats 1 and 29 ‘restricted view’ - luckily they are normally removed.

For musicals a sound desk occupies seats in rows N and O.

Changes for the current production:
The sightlines for this production are complicated, with many seats on one side of the theatre missing 5 minutes of the show, and others missing action on a high part of the set or even more. A chart showing this is available here.

The stage is high, and those in the first six rows won't see a bit of action behind a sofa. Doesn't matter, as no seat has a 100% view of all the action, the monkey thinks.

SPOILER ALERT: Row A is also a bit of a "splatter zone." Expect a few drops of water in your direction. SPOILER ENDS.

At top price the monkey would skip G and H 1, K to L 1 and 2, N2 and O1 for missing a bit on a raised part of the set.

Also at top price, the monkey would miss top price F19 to 21, G 21 to 23, H 22 and 23, J and K 23 and 24 as they are right next to seat which miss some staging. On the other hand, the £35 and £20 seats right next to these have to be a fair deal, and there are more of them, running from row F back. It would go for the £20 ones first (the £35 ones on L, M and N aren't worth the extra £15). Big cash saving for a small missed bit of the show, the monkey feels. Not for purists, but not bad at all. There is action missed, and some very good laughs - but not essential to following the plot. On the "low numbers" side, end pairs from F back are second price. The monkey would still miss these, as they miss far more of the show than the other side of the theatre.

Central rows E to J are "premium." Those in E and F seem a bit close to the monkey, but you'll get a 'close up' view, with fewer heads in the way. So, pay if you must. The less wealthy get the same views as always by sitting in the seats beside (monkey's first pick), in front or row L behind, for less cash.

Skip central row O, a long way back at full price, feels the monkey.
 

 

Reader Comments:
"A8: "Our Boys" (October 2012), (Taaljard). Bought a day seat for £10. A8 in the stalls. An excellent seat, stage is low and there is plenty of legroom so no need to look up."

“Row B: "The Secret of Sherlock Holmes" (August 2010). When Row A had been removed - as in this case - Row B was the front row. I was in Row B and it was quite a neck ache situation, and I am quite happy in the front row normally."

“B4: “Love Story”, (Mark). Got this on a £10 student offer. Excellent seats for the price I paid, but go a bit further back and central for top price."

"C1 and 2: "Love Story" (December 2010), (James – regular reader). Interestingly for this production, being at the end of the row doesn’t detract from the production or restrict the view. It’s an intimate show and it was great being so close, although I would have preferred to perhaps be a row or two further back just to avoid looking up at the stage as much as I did."

"C3 and 4: "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014). Excellent view. At first we thought seat number 3 and 4 would offer a side view, but there are fewer seats in the front rows. Just for comparison, C3 and C4 are at the same position as, say, F6 and F7. [spoiler alert!] Since we are almost level with the stage, we missed less than 1% of the act when an actress fainted behind the sofa. I wouldn't worry about that at all, as you can still figure out what happened in that scene. [spoiler ends]. In summary, these seats offer brilliant views!"

"C7, 8 , 9 and 10. "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014). Comfortable seats with a superb view (heights ranged from 5' 2" to 5' 11") and plenty of leg room. Be warned: the seats are lower than you might expect, which makes sitting down and getting up again a slight challenge for those of a less nimble disposition. No big deal, but just be aware of it if anyone in your party has real trouble with seat heights which are below average."

"C8 and 9: "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014). I totally agree with what is already on your site - perfect view apart from what goes on behind the sofa, we thought they were excellent - except for (as already stated) they are so low! Folding my 6'5" frame in was a challenge in itself, and once in I couldn't move, my knees were pressed up against the back of the chair in front, and became extremely painful by the end of each act. It's a good job the play was so entertaining! So I advise caution to those of a similar stature."

"E1 and 2: "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014). These were OK – decent leg room (but not as good as the end of F behind) but there’s virtually no rake so neck was feeling cricked."

"E13 to 16: "Sign Of The Times" (March 2011), (Clive). Excellent view of the whole stage and good leg-room. Fortunately no-one tall in front as there is no rake."

"F3 and 4..."The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014), (Alison Clark). Good value for money. Just a few seats along towards the centre of the stage the tickets were approx £20 more!! I felt that the view from F3 and F4 was good value for money. Pleasantly surprised at the legroom. I don't feel I missed anything."

"F20: (Mark) Seat was very good, no complaints at all." He felt the same about F16 at another show, too.

"F22: "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014). I booked a restricted view seat to save money... and what a bargain it turned out to be. Just £19 for seat F22 in the stalls. End of the row, no seat in front so endless legroom ( in fact I could have laid on the floor and not disturbed anyone ! ) and a great view. There is a fireplace stage left which cannot be seen from this seat so I guess I missed a few fireplace related jokes. Made no difference to me....I missed loads more jokes simply because I was crying with laughter and gasping for breath!"

“G4 and 5: (Lizzie) …although the seats were a little cramped, the view was very good."

"G7 and 8: "The Play that goes Wrong" (September 2014) (Mary). Great seats. The view was perfect with the entire set visible. At around 5'5" (165cm) we were comfortable."

"G14: (Mark). Wow! Amazing seat, view was perfect, although seats in the Duchess aren't exactly the comfiest to sit in; they are a bit hard and not a lot of padding!"

"G24: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014), (Yorkshire Monkey). (Restricted view) - hold the front page: plenty of leg room in London Theatre! And a goodish view of most of the stage; and all for £20. It's not all good news though as there was no description of what the restricted view was and it turned out, for this play, that it was quite significant. Many of the visual gags on the left of the stage were hidden."

“H18 and 19: Good seats, but I wouldn't want to be any further back."

"H20 and H21: Masses of legroom and an excellent view."

"J 11 and 12: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). Last row before centre aisle disappears. Clear central view. Row in front isn't much lower though."

"J13 and 14: “Love Story” (December 2010), (James – regular reader). Luckily we had no-one directly in front of us, as the rake is quite shallow. For this production I’d prefer to be a little closer (previously sitting in row C), to see everyone a bit more clearly but the seats were perfectly fine (especially at a discount) and the sound is great from here too."

"J21 to J24: "The Secret Of Sherlock Holmes" (July 2010), (Clive). The view was fine although the rake is poor. The seats were slightly cramped and a little uncomfortable. Leg-room was fairly average i.e. a little tight for my taste."

"K12 and 13: “Love Story”, (Annie Gross). Excellent seats, the row behind 'premium' and dashing good value."

"L17 and 18: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). As recommended on Theatre Monkey) and we were surprised at how small the Duchess Theatre was."

"L18: Thought the seat was great. The Duchess is such a tiny theatre!"

"L27 and L28. “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). End of row, restricted view. VERY restricted I would say, although I have never tried them before. There was an awful lot that couldn't be seen, not just a 5 minute scene as implied by Theatremonkey." (All seats have variable views - editor).

"M9 to 14: "Love Story" (November 2010), (Clive). A good view and also good legroom. However there was not a great difference in height between the seats and the row in front. The sound booth was immediately behind but caused no distractions at all."

"M15: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). Great seat on the centre aisle. It’s a small theatre, so you still feel reasonably close to the stage. Rake isn’t great though, so it’s an advantage to be able to crane your neck into the aisle so as not to miss any of the action - especially when it’s as crazy as in The Play That Goes Wrong!"

"M17: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). Since the theatre is rather small I had a good view. Legroom is not great, but adequate (I’m 6’2’’). After the interval I switched to empty seat L15. Heaven! I had two armrests for myself (L16 was also empty) and I could blissfully move my leg into the aisle. So if you can, get an aisle seat in row K or M."

"M23 and 24: "Fences" (June 2013), (Kev). Great view and decent value. Anywhere in the stalls from row G back is going to be perfectly fine, except maybe the very end of the rows. That said, rake is shallow and so anywhere in the stalls you run the risk of Tally Tall McTallpants blocking your view from the row in front."

“N13 and 14: "Krapp's Last Tape" (September 2010), (Clive). Perfect view with good rake and good legroom. The seats were comfortable but those of some fellow theatregoers were clearly very noisy."

"O6: “The Play That Goes Wrong” (September 2014). Generally an offer available for this current production so we got these seats for £20. Right at the back, but the Duchess is a cute little theatre so this is not an issue, and view was good. A little cramped legroom for the tall folk though."

"O15: "Love Story" (November 2010). The back row but still close enough to see well and feel involved. The Duchess theatre is small and intimate, just right for such a romantic play/musical. They really do need, however, to fix the seats in that row as when a rather large young couple sat down in seats O19 and 20 the whole row of seats rocked back three or four inches which was very disconcerting."

 

DRESS CIRCLE 
Called the Grand Circle in this theatre.

Layout:
Three rows in the front section, then a wide cross-aisle, into which an extra row, D, has been grafted.

Behind row D is a wall and a further section of seats.

Legroom:
Variable throughout the circle.

Rows A and E have walls in front. Those up to around 5ft should be fairly comfortable, though E 1 and 20 have a bit less legroom, and neither row is great if you are under around 5ft tall and wish to see over the wall in front.

Row D and seats J21 and 22, have most legroom, with nothing in front of them.

Elsewhere most find it adequate, suitable for those up to around 5ft 9 or so in A to H, perhaps an inch or two shorter in J. Seat backs curve, creating an extra toe-space between seats - thus gaining an extra inch of legroom from that gap.

Readers find row A tight at the ends (moans from seats 1 to 4) and slightly better further in (praise from a 5ft 9 person in 15).

Choosing Seats in General:
Judge Theatremonkey normally rules the stalls better value at top and second price, and the circle fair value for all or any cheaper seats. The view is fine up here, though.

If legroom is a factor, take either circle row D or the stalls row N or O (usually for less money than Dress Circle rows A to D too)... otherwise, there is little to choose between stalls and circle for view. Stalls are probably a bit closer, but circle is worth thinking about if there are lower price to attract.

In the rear circle, rows E to G are normally second price, with rows H and J at third. Skip E at top price – you can do better in either the rows in front or the stalls.

When only rows F and G are second price, the monkey takes into account both the distance from the stage and legroom between circle and stalls. Taller folk will be more comfortable downstairs, but upstairs is closer with less chance of a large head in the way. Your call, it feels. Remember that you can go one row back and save more cash for the same view, though.

For some productions, row J 5 to 18 is more expensive than seats next to it. The monkey would take the end four seats in the row first, simply on the principle that these are cheaper for pretty much the same view.

Row J21 and 22 are at the side of the theatre with only the aisle in front of them, these offer the cheapest priced maximum legroom option in the house, the only trade-off is the slightly more distant (but excellent) view of the stage. Also be aware that the step in front of them is short, so there isn't actually a space to rest your feet if you wish to stretch out - unless long legged enough to take advantage of the next step down, of course.

General Hazard Notes:
Row D has straight backed seats with flip-up arms... and ushers crossing in front of you during the performance.

Changes for the current production:
Central rows E and F are top price - skip E, maybe F if you have to, but go for F 17, 18, 4, 3 in that order, or central G behind and save a few pounds. Skip central H at second price and go for J. Same view, cheaper. Those on the end of J have the extra legroom as well.

 

Reader Comments:
"A1 to A4: (Clive). The view from anywhere in this row is fine but legroom is tight. With such a narrow stage the side two seats with increased legroom due to the semi-circle shape may actually be better than the middle for some theatregoers."

"A15: I have never had so much leg room in my life! There was over a foot of space in front of my knees, and I am by no means a midget at about 5'9 (neither do I have extremely short legs and a long torso). However, the front of the circle does cut off the actors from the knee down when they are at the front of the stage. This didn't matter that much for the production I saw because they were mostly standing around and having a chat, but if it was something with dancing or whatever then maybe not so good. But as a trade for losing feet you do get a really good close up view of the actors."

“Row B (Gavin Welch) View was good, legroom not too bad I thought."

"B15 and 16: "The Play That Goes Wrong" (September 2014), (Graham). Thought it was really lovely theatre. Not a large venue but big enough to create a great atmosphere. The circle is very well raked and the seats we sat in were very comfortable with very good legroom indeed and a very good view of the stage."

"C9 and C10: "The Hurly Burly Show" (August 2012). These seats were near the front of the dress circle so the view was quite good; we were able to see the stage well, with a good view without being too far away. I would not have liked to have been much further back than this. There was only one point where we couldn't see the action as one performer went into the front row of the audience, but it was only brief. I would recommend the seats as they are very good value for what you get."

"C18 and 19: "Fences" (July 2013). Bought these on offer at half price. Since it's a very intimate theatre, these seats still offer a reasonably close view so you can see facial expressions and set details. The front of the stage is slightly obstructed by the dress circle barrier, but not in any significant way - the actors never stood in any area we couldn't see."

"D19 and 20: "Love Story" (December 2010), (Lordship Theatregoers). Although seated at the end of the row in seats 19 and 20 the view of the stage was fine; but theatregoers should be aware that the seats in this row are not the same as the remainder of the theatre and the row is still used by the ushers as a gangway (which it presumably was before the installation of the seats). Seats in this row are more upright and have very straight across backs as well as annoying flip-up arms which make them not as comfortable as the others. Leg room is very good. In future we would choose to sit elsewhere especially for a 1¾ hour show without an interval."

“F5 and 6: “The Pitmen Painters,” (Chris B). We actually paid for tickets a couple of rows back from these seats but got upgraded as there were some free seats in front. This is only a little theatre but the dress circle does feel quite high up. However, there is a good, unobstructed view of the relatively small stage due to a good sized rake, with sufficient legroom.”

"J22: "The Wind In The Willows" (January 2014). The perfect location for anyone who arrives at the last minute, has long legs or both. There is nothing at all in front of it except the steps up to it (ditto J21) and any sense of being 'far from the stage' soon vanishes, especially if you've ever been in the back row of the Amphitheatre at the Royal Opera House (after that anything feels pretty close to the stage!). The excellent rake on the seats meant anyone else in that row can also see perfectly. Add to that the fact it is in the cheapest price band and it adds up to a real bargain."

 

Dress Circle Boxes

Layout:
Two boxes are bulges in the front outer corners of the Dress Circle, and two boxes at the rear of the Dress Circle behind row J.

Not often on sale as they are used for technical equipment.

Legroom:
Good in all seats as movable chairs are used. The front boxes have less of the two pairs, unless willing to sit back more from the front wall.

Choosing Seats in General:
Front Boxes:
These offer a side view but are worth considering if no stalls are available at the same price, and a little more legroom is required than other circle seats can provide.

Rear Boxes:
The view from both is unobstructed and the low price reflects the distance from the stage. These seats are worth considering as an alternative to rear circle tickets since they offer better legroom, often at a comparable price to the other cheapest seats in front.

General Hazard Notes:
None.

Changes for the current production:
Not a great deal, feels the monkey. Box E isn't sold (something in front of it is used in the show), and F has a restricted side view. B and C might be worth it for legroom at second price, but there are so many cheaper seats available (including dress circle unlimited legroom J 21 and 22), the monkey would take those instead.

Reader Comments:
None.

 

Notes
Total 495 seats.

Air-conditioned auditorium.

Infrared headsets available - not effective in the front three rows of the stalls or in boxes. Guide dogs can be dog sat. Wheelchair users can get down to the stalls and use spaces at N1 and N29 with the aid of an ATT Stair Climber. This must be booked in advance as it is not stored at the venue. Also note that the disabled toilet door opens INWARDS!  Fuller details from Nimax Theatres on 0844 482 9677 (10am to 6pm, Monday to Friday) or email access(insert the @ symbol here)nimaxtheatres.com, and independent details can be found at www.theatre-access.co.uk, Artsline 020 7388 2227, email artsline@dircon.co.uk. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here. One reader says (May 2010),
"We had one in our party in a wheelchair, just as well there was only one. It was fascinating seeing them load him on to a caterpillar track contraption that very slowly climbed up the stairs on rubber tracks. It would have taken an age to have dealt with more than one. but the staff were extremely obliging and helpful."
 

No food except Ice Cream and confectionery.

Two bars, Stalls and foyer (for the Dress Circle drinkers).

5 Toilets in all. Stalls 1 gents 2 cubicles, 1 ladies 4 cubicles, 1 unisex disabled; Dress Circle 1 gents 1 cubicle, 1 ladies 3 cubicles. One reader rated these the best in the West End! In 2015 another reader wrote, "Cheers for Nica Burns and her loo refit (maybe she really understands) – always grateful to her!"

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Covent Garden - Piccadilly Line (dark blue).

An ILLUSTRATED PHOTOGRAPHIC version of this route is available by clicking here.

For mobility impaired audience members, the Society of London Theatre provide a "photo map" - illustrated walking route to this venue from a near landmark and also Waterloo Station (the nearest fully accessible station) on their website www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk, via the theatre's listing page on that site.


On leaving the station, turn right and walk into the large pedestrian plaza that is Covent Garden. If you see a long road with cars in front of you, wrong way.

On entering the plaza space, turn to your left and walk along the collonaded area (cut across if it is not raining). If you see Tesco Metro Supermarket or a bank, Wrong way.

Keep walking ahead as far as the collonaded area will allow (it forms the outer part of the market Square). Follow it to the right. At the end of the building is Russell Street. Walk along Russell Street, crossing one road, until you reach a street corner with the Fortune Theatre to the left and the Drury Lane theatre ahead of you on the opposite side of the road. 

Take the road to your right, Catherine Street and walk on past the entrance of the Drury Lane theatre. If you do not pass the entrance doors, or pass the Fortune theatre, wrong way.

The Duchess Theatre is half way down the road on your right. 
___________________________

Also close to the theatre is Temple Station - Circle Line (yellow) and District Line (green).

This is closed on Sundays and some other times, so check before using. 

A photographic illustrated version of this route is available by clicking here.

If it is open, then leave the station turning left. If you see the river, wrong way!

Go up the steps and cross the road ahead of you. Keep walking straight on up Arundel Street (the road sloping upwards ahead of you).  Make sure you are on the left hand side pavement.

At the top of Arundel Street is "The Strand" and The Aldwych", a busy road intersection and cluster of buildings. You should not cross the road. Just turn to your left and walk down the Strand. 

Keep going until you come to another busy junction at the end of the buildings. Look to your right you see the Novello Theatre. Use the pedestrian crossings to get to it! The Duchess Theatre is in the road beside the Novello Theatre, to your left. 

 

Buses:
6, 11, 13, 15, all stop on the Aldwych. Walk towards the Strand Theatre and walk up the street next to it, the Duchess Theatre is on the left side of that street. If you see the Aldwych or Lyceum Theatres, wrong way.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a long distance from the theatre. Best chance of hailing one in the street is to walk down Catherine Street to the Strand / Aldwych.

 

Car Park:
Parker Street, under the New London Theatre. Exit the Car Park and stand with your back to the main foyer of the theatre. Cross the road ahead of you and turn to your right. The street corner is there ahead of you. If not, wrong way. At the corner of the street, Turn left into Drury Lane and walk along it. If you pass the New London Theatre, wrong way.

Walk straight on, crossing Great Queen Street. Continue down Drury Lane. Please cross to the other side of the street and continue, crossing over Broad Court and Martlett Court until you come to a four way crossroads.

Turn to your right at these crossroads. Do not cross any street. Just walk ahead down Russell Street. Cross Crown Court and continue straight on, changing to the other side of the street. 

The end of this street has the Drury Lane Theatre as its corner. Turn to your left at this corner to walk past the Drury Lane Theatre entrance. This is Catherine Street and walking downhill, the Duchess Theatre is halfway along on the other side of the road. If you come to Covent Garden pedestrian piazza, wrong way. 

 

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