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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

DORFMAN THEATRE



BARBER SHOP CHRONICLES (play)
Ends 9th January 2018.
Runs 2 hours approximately.




THE MAJORITY
(play)
Previews from 11th August, opens 14th August 2017. Ends 28th August 2017.
Audio-Described performances: 25th August 2017 at 7.30pm and 26th August 2017 at 2.30pm (touch tour is available on this date - ask box office for details).
Captioned performance: 28th August 2017 at 7.30pm.

 


MOSQUITOES (play)
Ends 28th September 2017.
Audio-Described performances: 15th September 2017 at 7.30pm and 16th September 2017 at 2.30pm (touch tour is available on this date - ask box office for details).
Captioned performances: 11th September at 7.30pm, 13th September 2017 at 2.30pm and 27th September 2017 at 7.30pm.

 

 

BEGINNING (play)
Previews from 5th October, opens 12th October 2017. Ends 14th November 2017.
Audio-Described performances: 10th November 2017 at 7.30pm and 11th November 2017 at 2.30pm (touch tour is available on this date - ask box office for details).
Captioned performances: 7th November 2017 at 2.30pm and 13th November at 7.30pm.


 

Barber Shop Chronicles: African men regard the barber's shop as a gathering place. From London to Harare, Accra and more, Inua Ellams' third play for the National Theatre takes a look at this world.

The Majority: Rob Drummond on referendums and elections. A chance to change a show by voting.

Mosquitoes: Jenny and Alice. One a Luton web surfer, the other a Geneva scientist. How do they cope with tragedy? Lucy Kirkwood play, Rufus Norris directs.

Beginning: Laura, Danny, the wreckage of a party, the start of something else? David Eldridge premiere, directed by Polly Findlay.

 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

Barber Shop Chronicles: Not available. Professional reviewers are unanimous in their praise. 6 barber shops, with music as we move between the conversations there. A football game provides the link, and local issues as well as global ones are discussed. There's praise for the immersiveness that begins as the house opens. More for the spell woven as the globe is embraced. The only critical comments are that occasionally the conversation feels "forced" as matters turn, and the Dorfman's acoustic isn't always the  best. That aside, it's a company show with 12 strong roles, tied with a neat reference, too. Worth seeing, is the verdict.

The Majority: Not available.

Mosquitoes: Not yet available.

Beginning: Not available.

 

  

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!

Barber Shop Chronicles: (1 review)

Heartbreaking, funny, fast moving, gripping ..... Loved it!!!



 


 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.
 

Barber Shop Chronicles:
8pm: 29, 30 November 2017; 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 29, 30 December 2017; 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 January 2018.


2pm: 2, 6, 9, 30 December 2017; 4, 6 January 2018.

 

 

The Majority:
Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm
Wednesday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm

 

 

Mosquitoes:
7.30pm: 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31 July 2017; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 29, 30, 31 August 2017; 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28 September 2017.

7pm: 24 July 2017.

2.30pm: 29 July 2017; 2, 5, 30 August 2017; 2, 5, 9, 13, 16, 20, 23, 26 September 2017.

 

Beginning:
Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm (7pm on 12th October 2017)
Tuesday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm

 

Ticket Prices:

Offers May be available - Click Here

View this information in diagram form when usual layout is in use.

Barber Shop Chronicles:
Details will change, the monkey will update as available.
All performances EXCEPT Friday and Saturday Evenings, and Previews:
Pit:
Rows K, L, EE, FF and HH: £35
Rows DD and HH, plus M 26 to 37: £30
Row B, plus L 1 to 25 and 38 to 65 and X 1 to 7 and 66 to 72, and BB 8 and 65: £25
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £15

Circle
Row N centre: £35
Row P centre: £30
Row N sides 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £30
Row P sides 5 to 14, 16, 17, 51, 52, 54 to 63: £25
Row P sides: 1 to 4, 13, 53, 64 to 67: £15

Gallery
Centre block row R: £30
Side block row R 10 to 24 and 51 to 65: £20
Row R 1 to 9 and 66 to 74, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

Friday and Saturday Evenings:
Pit:
Rows K, L, EE, FF and HH: £40
Rows DD and HH, plus M 26 to 37: £35
Row B, plus L 1 to 25 and 38 to 65 and X 1 to 7 and 66 to 72, and BB 8 and 65: £25
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £15

Circle
Row N centre: £40
Row P centre: £35
Row N sides 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £30
Row P sides 5 to 14, 16, 17, 51, 52, 54 to 63: £25
Row P sides: 1 to 4, 13, 53, 64 to 67: £15
Gallery
Centre block row R: £35
Side block row R 10 to 24 and 51 to 65: £20
Row R 1 to 9 and 66 to 74, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

 

The Majority:
Details will change, the monkey will update as available.

All performances EXCEPT Friday and Saturday Evenings, and Previews:
Pit:
All seats: £35 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £25

Circle
Row N and P centre: £35
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £25
Row P sides: £20 (P 15 and 52: £15)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £20
Side block row R 5 to 22 and 53 to 70: £20
Row R 1 to 4, 23, 24, 51, 52, 71 to 74, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

Friday and Saturday Evenings:
Pit:
All seats: £40 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £35

Circle
Row N and P centre: £40
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £35
Row P sides: £30 (P 15 and 52: £18)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £30
Side block row R 5 to 22 and 53 to 70: £30
Row R 1 to 4, 23, 24, 51, 52, 71 to 74, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £18
 

Previews:
Pit:
All seats: £30 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £22

Circle
Row N and P centre: £30
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £22
Row P sides: £22 (P 15 and 52: £15)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £18
Side block row R 5 to 22 and 53 to 70: £18
Row R 1 to 4, 23, 24, 51, 52, 71 to 74, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15
 

 

Mosquitoes:
All performances EXCEPT Friday and Saturday Evenings, and Previews:
Pit:
All seats: £47 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £41

Circle
Row N and P centre: £47
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £41
Row P sides: £29 (P 15 and 52: £15)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £29
Side block row R 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £29
Row R 4, 5, 70, 71, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 



Friday and Saturday Evenings:
Pit:
All seats: £52 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £46

Circle
Row N and P centre: £52
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £46
Row P sides: £31 (P 15 and 52: £18)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £31
Side block row R 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £31
Row R 4, 5, 70, 71, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £18



Previews except first two previews:
Pit:
All seats: £37 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £32

Circle
Row N and P centre: £37
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £32
Row P sides: £26 (P 15 and 52: £15)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £26
Side block row R 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £26
Row R 4, 5, 70, 71, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 


First two previews only:
Pit:
All seats: £32 except
Row M 1 to 11 and 51 to 61: £32

Circle
Row N and P centre: £32
Row N sides 6 to 22 and 52 to 69: £32
Row P sides: £22 (P 15 and 52: £15)

Gallery
Centre block row R: £22
Side block row R 6 to 24 and 51 to 69: £22
Row R 4, 5, 70, 71, and Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

 

Beginning:
All performances EXCEPT Friday and Saturday Evenings and previews:
Pit: £40 except
Single fold up seats at the ends of rows A to J: £36
Row L 23 to 42: £36
Row L 1 to 22 and 42 to 65, M 21 to 42: £36
Row M 1 to 11, 23 to 40, 51 to 61: £36 except
Row M restricted view 5, 9, 12, 22, 41, 42, 53, 57: £25

Circle
Row N 31 to 50: £40
Row P centre plus N 33, 34, 47, 48: £36
Row N sides: £36
Row P sides: £25

Gallery
Centre block row R: £36
Side block row R: £25
Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

Friday and Saturday Evenings:
Pit: £45 except
Single fold up seats at the ends of rows A to J: £36
Row L 23 to 42: £36
Row L 1 to 22 and 42 to 65, M 21 to 42: £36
Row M 1 to 11, 23 to 40, 51 to 61: £36 except
Row M restricted view 5, 9, 12, 22, 41, 42, 53, 57: £25

Circle
Row N 31 to 50: £45
Row P centre plus N 33, 34, 47, 48: £36
Row N sides: £36
Row P sides: £25
Gallery
Centre block row R: £36
Side block row R: £25
Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £18
 

 

Previews EXCEPT first two previews:
Pit: £34 except
Single fold up seats at the ends of rows A to J: £32
Row L 23 to 42: £32
Row L 1 to 22 and 42 to 65, M 21 to 42: £32
Row M 1 to 11, 23 to 40, 51 to 61: £32 except
Row M restricted view 5, 9, 12, 22, 41, 42, 53, 57: £22

Circle
Row N 31 to 50: £34
Row P centre plus N 33, 34, 47, 48: £32
Row N sides: £32
Row P sides: £22
Gallery
Centre block row R: £32
Side block row R: £22
Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15


First two previews only:
Pit: £32 except
Single fold up seats at the ends of rows A to J: £25
Row L 23 to 42: £25
Row L 1 to 22 and 42 to 65, M 21 to 42: £25
Row M 1 to 11, 23 to 40, 51 to 61: £25 except
Row M restricted view 5, 9, 12, 22, 41, 42, 53, 57: £22

Circle
Row N 31 to 50: £32
Row P centre plus N 33, 34, 47, 48: £25
Row N sides: £25
Row P sides: £22
Gallery
Centre block row R: £25
Side block row R: £22
Side block high seats (restricted view) row S: £15

 

SOME DETAILS MAY CHANGE. THE MONKEY WILL UPDATE AS AVAILABLE..


"FRIDAY RUSH TICKETS." Every Friday at 12 noon, a number of £20 seats will be released online and by phone for the following week's performances. A limited number of £15 / £18 "Day Seats" are also sold on the day of performance to personal callers at the box office from 10am (doors to the building open at 9.30am).

 

 

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.nationaltheatre.org.uk
operated by the venue itself.
For most productions, the system also allows you to select an exact seat in the theatre, and also view the auditorium via photographs taken from various positions within it. Note that the tickets offered may differ between phone and online sources.

When collecting tickets, the automatic ticket dispensing machines don't work if you collect your tickets within around 40 minutes of the performance time. This is because the theatre print out uncollected tickets around that time, and you have to collect them from the theatre's information desk instead. So, if the machine won't print them, go to the Dorfman Information Desk (NOT the general box office) and they should be there.
 

 

Booking fees per ticket for online bookings:
There is no fee for online bookings, except for a £1 charge levied per booking to cover postage. Avoid it by booking in person, collecting your tickets on the day, or enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope with a postal booking as no fees are charged with those methods. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this last, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own. All cheaper than the £2.50 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee made for phone bookings - to which the optional £1 postage fee also applies.

 

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.


 

 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 020 7452 3000. fax: 020 7452 3030
Operated by venue itself.

A £2.50 fee per booking, not per ticket, fee is charged for phone bookings. An optional £1 charge is also levied per booking to cover postage. This is more expensive than booking online, where only the optional £1 postage charge applies.

When collecting tickets, the automatic ticket dispensing machines don't work if you collect your tickets within around 40 minutes of the performance time. This is because the theatre print out uncollected tickets around that time, and you have to collect them from the theatre's information desk instead. So, if the machine won't print them, go to the Dorfman Information Desk (NOT the general box office) and they should be there.

 

For personal callers or by post: Dorfman Theatre, Royal National Theatre, South Bank, SE1 9PX
No booking fee for personal callers. The advance box office is in the foyer of the main part of the theatre, not within the separate Dorfman Theatre foyer.

By post, the optional £1 per booking, not per ticket, postage charge applies, unless you are enclosing your own stamped, self addressed envelope. Reader CC notes that the Box Office don't mind this, though points out that you don't get the smart envelope, nice bit of cardboard and pretty leaflets with tickets, well worth the extra few pence, if you send your own.

A reader notes about "Day Seats" in 2011:
"I got to the box office about 9:30am and there was already a pretty longish queue outside (they don't let you move inside and start selling until 10, not great if it's raining). The queue took about 45 minutes so I'd suggest you take a book/ipod for the wait. The seats for the evening performance were all taken by then but there were still plenty of standing seats available. I was still able to get a seat for that day as there was a matinee performance with seats spare (Matinees are generally easier to get tickets for)."

 

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

www.nationaltheatre.org.uk is the official theatre website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

A  STUDIO THEATRE, NEWLY RE-BUILT FOR 2014. The Monkey has posted its "initial opinion" below, and welcomes comments to the usual address.

A simple black rectangular room. Seats are at ground level, with more at Dress and Upper Circle level. Ground level seats are arranged to suit each different production. All ground level seats are sometimes removed for promenade performances (when the audiences stand and follow the actors about the floor like sheep). A first time visitor feels it is,
"A lovely theatre. It felt quite intimate, in a good way."
 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Upper Circle Notes
STALLS 
Called PIT LEVEL in this theatre.

Layout:
When used, it has 11 rows facing the stage, with 2 further rows behind and 2 down the sides.

In "shallow configuration" seats are on very shallow tiered steps back to row K. Row L is behind a rail on another step. Row M is behind another rail, and are stool type seats raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out.

Rows B to K are well-offset to see around seats in front, B 1 and 15 seem to have a bigger gap to look through than the others.

Seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15 are not the same as other seats. They are narrower, small square padded leather seats - like those you'd expect in a "kitchen breakfast bar" setting at a posh furniture shop. Worse, they involve a little "D.I.Y" to operate. On arrival, ask the person in seats 2 and 14 to move their coat. Then disappoint the person behind (who expected a clear view with nobody in front) by pulling the top of the seat (with the row letter on it) towards the aisle, through 90 degrees, to make it flat. Then lift the flap to form the backrest, and be seated.

Row L at the sides has a "rollercoaster" style safety rail sticking out at midriff level when seated.

In "steep configuration" rows A to K rise steeply up to circle level, improving sightlines no end for those in the centre block.

Seats do not have arm-rests.

Legroom:
Row A has unlimited legroom.

Acceptable for those up to 5ft 11 or so in rows B to K.

D, F, H and K 1 and E, D and J 15 have more legroom where the folding seat in front is off-set.

Row L is suitable for those up to around 5ft 8 or so.

Row M high chairs may suit those up to around 6ft, but those under 5ft may find them a climb.

Choosing Seats in General:
This is trickier than the monkey expected. In "end stage" view, the rake (tiering on steps between seats) in the centre block isn't as steep as it would have liked in "shallow configuration" mode. Tall folk in front could spell trouble. Hence it would go for rows A to D in that order, if under 5ft 7 or so.

It would take folding seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15 last if "broader in the beam" or not particularly adept or strong at folding furniture as frankly they really are smaller, less comfortable and a faff in general, it feels.

Row M seems too far back and behind a rail to justify the top price. Going a single row back, the seats are higher and cheaper, just a bit better value, the monkey feels. Worth watching for the metal pillars at the end of this row too. Not in sightlines to the stage, but just "there" for purists.

At the sides, the monkey would probably take M 1 to 5 and 61 to 65 or N 1 to 4 and 51 to 58 first. They are almost "on the stage," but at least you don't have to turn your head sideways to view - even if you risk set items blocking the rear corner of the stage. The elevated row N may in fact give a slightly better angle. It will test that over future productions. M57, "slightly restricted view" second price was a total bargain for "The Red Lion," an "end stage" show, the monkey felt. Couldn't see the side wall nearest it, without leaning backwards, but otherwise, as close as anyone in the fourth row to the action, for half the cash.

In "high stalls" configuration, the sides from 6 seats along won't see, as they are level with centre block row E - they are not sold for this reason.

Further along the sides, away from the stage, do expect to look sideways. Anyone leaning forward will block your view. On the plus side, these are better than any seat at the same price in the circle above, as you won't lose the edges of the stage if everybody behaves themselves as they should. Again, row N may help in this regard, height aiding seeing over the row in front.

General Hazard Notes:
The folding seats A, C, E, G and J 1 and B, D, F, H and K 15.

The shallow steps in the centre block, in "shallow configuration" layout.

Anyone leaning forward in the side galleries.

High seats may be difficult for the shorter or infirm.

 

Changes for the current productions:
B
arber Shop Chronicles: A stage in the centre, seats on four sides. Rows B, DD and K are flat on the floor, EE to HH raised in steps. Good views from all. Row X extends down the sides, and BB 8 and 65 are tacked on the ends of side row B. Again, fair value, but remember those in X will look sideways to the action. Row L is top price, beware the bar.

The Majority and Mosquitoes: Share a layout of two blocks with a stage between at pit level, and the usual seats at the sides - except that centre block L and M are not used. Good view for all, the monkey thinks, just watch legroom on row L. An extra row of 4 seats has also been placed behind row M for "Mosquitoes." The monkey will update as available.

Beginning: Standard "End On" staging is used.


Reader Comments:
"Seats on the stage: "Love" (December 2016). Heads up for those people who have booked seats at the front of the stage (not so much on the sides of the stage) ..... You will very much be part of the action. The chairs are all freestanding and the actors weave in and out, so maybe not the best choice if you don't like that sort of thing."

"Seats on the stage: "Love" (December 2016). We got restricted view tickets " on stage" in front row --- excellent position for all the action."

"Rows A to C: "The Flick" (May 2016). From what I could see, the first 3 rows in the Pit are on the same level for this production (i.e. no rake for rows B and C). I'm not sure why this is - maybe the stage is slightly further forward than normal for an "end stage" configuration.
The set is as expected. The "fourth wall" is where the cinema screen would be, so the audience are looking into the cinema auditorium from "behind the screen". The cast perform standing or seated in a variety of the cinema seats on the set. At a few points, there is activity in the projection room of the cinema (two small windows high in the rear wall of the set enable the audience to see this). I think you'll be fine in row A other than possibly having to look up at some points during the production."

"B8: "The Pacifists Guide to War on Cancer" (November 2016) - B8 - £20 Friday rush - Bargain. Perfect clear view."

"C 28 and 29: "Rules for Living" (May 2015). Not the most comfortable night I have ever had in the theatre, being a wide person, the seats are awfully narrow, and reasonably tall, 5' 7", the seat height was awkward. I could not quite reach the floor, but to try and perch my feet on the shelf the seats were fixed to, was a little too uncomfortable. Judging by the fidgeting going on around me, everyone else was having the same trouble. The 2 rows in front, and the one behind seemed fine though. The sight lines are not good either, some things were missed completely, but the sound was good, so we heard everything."

"D1 and E1: 'Husbands and Sons' (October 2015). My seat cost £20 and was 'On Stage' - D1 for the first half, then switched to the opposite side, E1, after the interval. What stunning seats!! and you're literally on the edge of the action. This play is performed 'in the round' and I don't believe there would be a bad view anywhere in the theatre. Even sitting literally on the edge of the stage, there was plenty of legroom. Seats are reasonably narrow, flip down seats with no arm rest, but perfectly comfortable. I sat on the end of the row where actors were entering and exiting. You're asked to leave coats and bags in the cloakroom, which is understandable in view of the proximity to the stage. Sitting in seat E1 for the first half, I was really cold!! Not sure if they had the aircon cranked up, or if it was the end of the row with a void underneath and behind the seat. Worth a mention, especially as you're asked not to take coats in. The queue for the cloakroom afterwards was fine. They had four members of staff on, so the turnaround was really fast. Absolute billy bargain."

"G14: "Love" (December 2016). Lots of legroom, good rake .... No armrests though so you are a bit packed together."

"Row H: "Love (December 2016). A reader notes that, "row H low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"K15: "The Hard Problem" (February 2015). £15 seats thus priced due to a “restricted view” but I was unaware of this until after the show. Not sure what I missed, but thought I could see everything. K15 is one of the ‘fold-up’ seats you flagged up in your notes. I had a chuckle to myself when I saw K14’s coat and bag where you had forecast they would be. The seat was great for £15 but if I had paid full whack I would have been annoyed."

"M53: "Sunset at The Villa Thalia" (July 2016). Billed as restricted view .... Maybe the worst seat (view) I've ever had in a theatre. The stage has been extended into the void where several rows of the stalls have been removed. Sitting in that seat you are right behind a large pillar which basically means you can't see a thing unless you lean forward (therefore obscuring the view of those in M52 and M51 which I'm too polite to do) or lean back, but then the pillar still obscures most of the stage. It's a block of three seats and the couple in the other two seats left at the interval so I was able to move to M51 for the second half and got to actually see something. I was disappointed but suppose I should have realised that, just for once, restricted view really meant just that! £15 so I shouldn't grumble."


 

DRESS CIRCLE 
Called CIRCLE in this theatre.

Layout:
Two rows of seats facing the stage, and two down either side.

The front row, N, are ordinary seats; the row behind are higher, raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out. Both do not have arm-rests but are comfy.

Legroom:
Row N is cramped for anyone over around 5ft 8.

Row P is good for the taller, though there isn't as much "knee room" as you may think.

Choosing Seats in General:
The monkey prefers P for comfort for sure.

Side rows N and P lose at least a tenth of the nearside stage to the wall in the way. The monkey would take seats nearest the stage first, to avoid the issue. It would also take row P before row N. N suffers far more loss of view as it is lower, and more expensive than P too. As a reader observes, if the stage is at one end of the theatre, you have to look sideways at the stage - and with the angle and anyone leaning... just go for rows M or L in the pit below at the sides before row N, feels the monkey.

The viewing angle is actually less comfortable the closer you get to the stage.

General Hazard Notes:
Substantial loss of views when the stage is "end on" and folk lean into your view.

Pillars between P 9 / 10, 14 / 16, 53 / 54, 58 / 60 cut slightly into views, but are not that noticeable.

High seats may be difficult for the shorter or infirm.

The continuous row N may be claustrophobic for some.
 

Changes for the current productions:
Barber Shop Chronicles: A stage in the centre, seats on three sides. The monkey will add details when available, but thinks seats have a good view - better bets than same priced seats in the Gallery above, anyway... Be aware the better seats are in the centre of the side rows, not the ends.

The Majority and Mosquitoes: Share a layout of two blocks with a stage between at pit level, and the usual seats at the sides - except that centre block L and M are not used. Good view for all, the monkey thinks, just watch legroom on row N. Row P at third price look a safe bet, it feels.
 

Beginning: Standard "End On" staging is used.


Reader Comments:
"N1: "Love" (December 2016). The view wouldn't have been ideal, but would have been the usual restricted view that you know you're going to get when booking that area. For people who have already bought those tickets though, it might be worth asking for an upgrade?"

"N9: "Here Lies Love" (September 2014) (Taljaard). For this show, this is the front row of the circle. Very comfy indeed."

"N17 and 18 "The Hard Problem" (January 2015). Oh dear the seats. We didn’t have a problem with the legroom (5ft 9) but hated having to twist round in our seats to see the stage which was also partly obscured. Most people sitting in the side rows ended up perched on their seats at 45 degrees. I won’t be booking the side seats again."

""Row P: "Love (December 2016). P low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"P10: "Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour" (September 2016), (Taljaard). Sat in P10 and missed nothing. Very good value for £15."

"P53: "Cleansed" (February 2016). Reduced to £20 due to pillar imposition. It's fair value, but I was pretty uncomfortable. I had to lean forward over the safety rail to get a decent view most of the time."

 



UPPER CIRCLE
Called GALLERY in this theatre.

Layout:
One row of seats facing the stage, and two down either side.

The front row, R, are ordinary seats; the row behind are higher, raised on a high plinth, with foot rests that fold out. Both do not have arm-rests but are comfy.
 

Legroom:
Just acceptable for those of 5ft 7 in row M if willing to sit bolt upright in your seat, row S is good for the taller, though there isn't as much "knee room" as you may think.

Choosing Seats in General:
Seats facing the stage are fine, if you can accept the legroom.

Side rows R and S lose around a tenth of the nearside stage to the wall in the way. If the stage is "end on" a reader in R 22 to 24 noted they saw only 15% of the show. The viewing angle improves as you get closer to the stage, but loses more of what is directly below you, as it were.

General Hazard Notes:
Row S seats are in small blocks surrounded by rails. Those under 5ft 4 or so may find their views blocked by that, and both they and the infirm may struggle to get into the high seats.

Vertigo sufferers may find row S a little too high for them.

Substantial loss of views when the stage is "end on" and folk lean into your view.

The continuous row R may be claustrophobic for some.
 

 

Changes for the current productions:
Barber Shop Chronicles: A stage in the centre, seats on three sides. The same priced seats in the circle and pit areas will probably have a better view for the same bananas. Be aware the better seats are in the centre of the side rows, not the ends.

The Majority and Mosquitoes: Share a layout of two blocks with a stage between at pit level, and the usual seats at the sides. Average view for all up here, the monkey thinks, and watch legroom in side row R. A couple of seats there at the ends are lowest price for "The Majority" and "Mosquitoes," also indicating a view issue, it feels.

Beginning: Standard "End On" staging is used.


Reader Comments:
"Upper Gallery: "Love" (December 2016). For anyone in the upper gallery who has booked a seat on the side ..... Think you'll struggle to see much at all."

"Row R: "Love (December 2016). R low numbers (stage left) for Love at National fairly restricted view, a part of the set extends under the balcony."

"R44: "People, Places and Things" (September 2015). Couldn't recommend it enough. My seat - R44 at 25 pounds - was advertised as restricted but I had a clear view. Probably better than those in stalls in fact, as there are scenes were the floor is illuminated with visuals (similar to the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time) and you get an overall view of these from where I sat."

"R70: "The Hard Problem" (January 2015), (Taljaard). Hovers above the front of the stage three tiers up. Good view for £15."

"S58: "Consent" (March 2017). I think you should know that the gallery seats for 'Consent' have their view badly obscured by a very inconsiderate feature of the set, namely dozens of lampshades suspended below the level of the gallery seats. So what is already a poor view (mainly of the tops of actors' heads, and in Seat S58 you sometimes just hear disembodied voices) has now been turned into a terrible one."
 

 

Notes
Seats 350 approx.

Air conditioned auditorium.

Audio described and signed performances regularly. Headset system available. Guide dog sitter available. All printed information available in large print, on tape and in Braille. Minicom at the box office. Access to Dorfman is level, with a lift to the gallery. Free car parking in centre car park for orange badge holders (get endorsement stamp at information desk). Lifts from car parks to all levels.

Adapted toilets (unisex, sadly) throughout theatre. Fuller details from www.theatre-access.co.uk, the theatre on 020 7633 0880, Artsline 020 7388 2227, email artsline@dircon.co.uk. A "venue access guide" from the team who created book "Theatremonkey: A Guide to London's West End," is available to download in PDF format by clicking here.

Bars throughout the complex.

Restaurant, Buffet and Coffee bars in centre. Ice cream and confectionery in auditoriums. Theatremonkey rates the chocolate ice cream highly.

Adequate toilets throughout the centre.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Waterloo - Bakerloo Line (brown), Jubilee Line (silver gray), Northern Line (black). Also a main line station.

A PHOTOGRAPH ILLUSTRATED VERSION of this walking route is available by clicking here.

For mobility impaired audience members, the Society of London Theatre provide a "photo map" - illustrated walking route to this venue from a near landmark and also Waterloo Station (the nearest fully accessible station) on their website www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk, via the theatre's listing page on that site.


This station has multiple exits, not clearly marked, so be careful! The best route is as follows:

IN NOVEMBER 2015 THE "York Road" station exit closed until 2018. THIS MEANS THAT YOUR ROUTE IS NOW TO FOLLOW SIGNS FROM THE PLATFORM TO THE MAINLINE STATION EXIT. This will bring you into the middle of the station concourse.

Turn left and head for the main exit - a grand archway with steps down to street level.

At street level, turn to your left, and walk towards the main road. Ahead to your left is a huge silver steel rectangle. No, the monkey does not know what it is either. To the left of it, and behind, is a pedestrian passageway called "Sutton Walk"; which goes under a bridge. Take it, at the end is a fountain ahead of you. 

You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. You are in an area of grey concrete called Belvedere Road.

Turn to your right, walk along this street under the bridge, and note that the road name changes to "Upper Ground".

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the scenery entrance and Max Rayne Centre - the glass building sticking out into the paved area - and along to a column signpost with the NT symbol on it. Turn down the wide paved road / piazza combination area to your left, and you'll see another sign pointing along the paved area you are walking on, down to the National Theatre's car park.

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is along this street too, past the Clore Learning Centre to your left, about two thirds of the way down, where the shallow staircase is.
____________

If you have the misfortune to leave the station by the "Waterloo Road" exit, fear not. You can either walk through the Waterloo mainline station to the York Road exit, or take this route - CONSIDER YOUR PERSONAL SAFETY when choosing.

On leaving the glass doors, turn left. Walk to the corner, and turn left into "Mepham Street". Walk all the way to the end of it, avoiding the temptation to go under any bridges.

At the end of the street is York Road. Cross it. Ahead of you, to the left, is "Sutton Walk", the pedestrian road under the bridge. Take it.

You are now on "Concert Road Approach". Turn to your left. The Royal Festival Hall is ahead of you. Walk towards it. You are in an area of grey concrete called Belvedere Road.

Turn to your right, walk along this street under the bridge, and note that the road name changes to "Upper Ground".

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the scenery entrance and Max Rayne Centre - the glass building sticking out into the paved area - and along to a column signpost with the NT symbol on it. Turn down the wide paved road / piazza combination area to your left, and you'll see another sign pointing along the paved area you are walking on, down to the National Theatre's car park.

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is along this street too, past the Clore Learning Centre to your left, about two thirds of the way down, where the shallow staircase is.
____________

Another visitor suggest this route: Take the tube to the Embankment station and walk across the Hungerford footbridge to the south bank, then walk past Festival Hall complex and under Waterloo Bridge.

The Royal National Theatre is ahead of you to the right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, where the shallow staircase leads up to it.

Noted are the "Gorgeous views both up and down river on a good day or evening.". The monkey endorses this comment, especially at twilight!

 

Buses:
1, 4, 68, X68, 168, 171, 176, 188, 501, 502, 513 to Waterloo Bridge.

Get off on the Bridge and look for the large advertising board on the roof of the National Theatre, facing the Thames. Take the stairs on this side of the bridge down to the ground. A safe crossing of the bridge can be made by taking the stairs down to first level and walking under it on a walkway linking the staircases either side of the bridge.

On the correct side staircase, leave it, turn to your right. The theatre is ahead of you to the right. 

The entrance to the Dorfman Theatre is at the far end of the building, so walk on past the circular floor sculpture and past the centre doors of the theatre and at the end of the building turn right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, with a shallow staircase leading up to it.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Waterloo Station - a fair distance from the theatre, or try hailing one on Waterloo Bridge.

 

Car Park:
Under the theatre. Take the elevators in the centre of the car park to ground level.

Leave the elevator and exit the building by the glass doors between the elevators. Once outside, turn to your right, and at the end of the building turn right. 

Walk past the stage door and the car park entrance, and the Dorfman Theatre entrance is in a new extension on the right, with a shallow staircase leading up to it.

Theatremonkey advises parking near the exit ramps for a fast getaway after the show, and strongly recommends you note the compass point, colour band and number of the nearest pillar you park by. Banquo's ghost has nothing on the haunted souls who wander the underground space, wailing for their transport each night. Some have been there since the place opened in the 1970's.


 

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