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Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

DONMAR WAREHOUSE THEATRE


 


THE RESISTIBLE RISE OF ARTURO UI (play)
Previews from 20th April, opens 2nd May 2017. Ends 17th June 2017.
Captioned performance: 5th June 2017 at 7.30pm
Audio Described performance: 10th June 2017 at 2.30pm (touch tour 1.30pm)

Chicago protection racketeer Ui thrives in the Great Depression... until corruption becomes out of control.

Bruce Norris translates Bertolt Brecht for Lenny Henry to star.






WHEN A PRODUCTION IS SOLD OUT:

"Klaxon" Scheme:
Each Monday, a small number of tickets in each price band are released ONLINE ONLY for performances two weeks later. These are limited to TWO per production.

The Donmar Warehouse also hold 20 STANDING PLACES
In the rear circle are available at £10 each at all performances EXCEPT on Press Night. Standing places are normally only sold only to personal callers at the theatre box office from 10am, maximum two tickets per person. Occasionally if there is no demand, they may sell to telephone callers later in the day - but that is generally unlikely and visiting the theatre is far safer feels the monkey.

It's also always worth checking the www.donmarwarehouse.com website regularly, as seats seem to creep back onto it regularly - even during a "sold out" run...

 

Theatremonkey Opinion:

Not yet available.
 

Your Reviews: Add your own by clicking here.
Important: Some reviews below can contain "spoilers" - please don't read if this bothers you!
 

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Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Performance Schedule:
The monkey advises checking performance times on your tickets and that performances are happening as scheduled, before travelling.

Monday to Saturday at 7.30pm (2nd May 2017 at 7pm)
Thursday and Saturday at 2.30pm and 7.30pm


 

Ticket Prices:
View this information in diagram form


All performances EXCEPT previews:
Stalls

Centre block £40
Side blocks
Row A seats 1 to 7, 34 to 42; B 3 to 8 and 31 to 37; C 3 to 9 and 31 to 38; D 3 to 9 and 31 to 38: £40
Row B 1, 2 and 38 to 41; C 1, 2, 39 to 41; D 2, 39 to 41: £30

NOTE: For "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui" all stalls seats except row D are replaced by tables and chairs around the playing space. Prices remain the same.

Dress Circle
Centre block £30
Side block row A: £30
Side block row B: £20
Side block row C £10




Previews (performances prior to opening night):
Stalls

Centre block £37.50
Side blocks
Row A seats 1 to 7, 34 to 42; B 3 to 8 and 31 to 37; C 3 to 9 and 31 to 38; D 3 to 9 and 31 to 38: £37.50
Row B 1, 2 and 38 to 41; C 1, 2, 39 to 41; D 2, 39 to 41: £27.50

NOTE: For "The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui" all stalls seats except row D are replaced by tables and chairs around the playing space. Prices remain the same.


Dress Circle

Centre block £27.50
Side block row A: £27.50
Side block row B: £17.50
Side block row C £10


Those aged over 60 can buy £40 or £30 seats for £32.50 / £25 at all afternoon performances ONLY.
 

 

"Klaxon" Scheme:
Each Monday, a small number of tickets in each price band are released ONLINE ONLY for performances two weeks later. These are limited to TWO per production.
 

When a production is SOLD OUT at the theatre box office:
The Donmar Warehouse hold 20 STANDING PLACES in the rear circle are available at £10 each at all performances EXCEPT on Press Night. Standing places are normally only sold only to personal callers at the theatre box office from 10am, maximum two tickets per person. Occasionally if there is no demand, they may sell to telephone callers later in the day - but that is generally unlikely and visiting the theatre is far safer feels the monkey.

In September 2011 a reader notes,
"1) Payment is only accepted by card and even then you have to go back to collect the tickets half an hour before the performance. I think it is to discourage touts, but it also meant several disappointed people in the queue I was in. They had been in the queue since around 8.30am and someone only came out to mention this policy at 10am, half an hour before ticket sales started.

2) It is worth turning up at least two hours early (i.e. 8.30am at the latest) to be sure of getting a seat or standing ticket. I queued on a matinee day (Thursday) and anyone who got there after about 9am that day would be disappointed.

3) The standing tickets don’t allocate you a specific place at the back – it’s first come first served. So if you want to stand in the middle rather than towards the sides, you should get there sharp."

The monkey always advises taking cash as well as cards in case the policy changes, and to check with the venue that the policy is in operation before travelling long distances.

It's also worth checking the www.donmarwarehouse.com website regularly, as seats seem to creep back onto it regularly - even during a "sold out" run...
 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Buying Tickets Online:

Other Box Office Information

Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
www.donmarwarehouse.com the theatre's own website provide the service for this theatre.
This system allows you to select your seat from all those available on an online seating plan.
 

Booking fees per transaction for online bookings:
£1 per booking, not per ticket for postage. No fee if you choose "print at home" or "collect on the day" options.

Other Online Choices (with S.T.A.R. genuine ticket agencies):

Independent S.T.A.R. ticket agencies may also offer an alternative choice of seats.


 

Box Office Information:
Tickets offered differ between outlets. Outlets also may offer different seats via their phone and online systems. Offers may be available click here.
Theatre Box Office:
Telephone: 0844 871 7624
Operated by the venue.

Booking fees per transaction for telephone bookings:
£1 per booking, not per ticket for postage. No fee if you choose "print at home" or "collect on the day" options.

For personal callers or by post: Earlham Street, London. WC2H 9LX
No booking fee for personal callers.

 

Special Access Needs Customers:
Wheelchair users and other registered disabled theatregoers can book their seats and enquire about concessionary prices that may be available to them on a dedicated phone line. See Notes.

www.donmarwarehouse.com is the official theatre website.

 

 
 
Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Theatre Seat Opinions:
Please remember that cheaper seats often do not offer the same view / location quality as top price ones, and that ticket prices are designed to reflect this difference.

 

Seating Plan Diagram

Stalls Dress Circle Notes
STALLS 
Layout:
The Circle overhangs the stalls at row C, and may affect the view of the very top of the set in row D, plus C if lighting is suspended from the ceiling.

Four rows of raked (seats on steps to help see over rows in front) benches surround a large square stage on three sides.

Legroom:
Acceptable throughout the stalls except in row A when a raised stage is used - cramped for those seated there as it prevents stretching legs out.

Seats B 8, 13, 29, 41 C 9, 11, 30 and D 10 have nothing in front of them. D9 has around 5% of the width free in front of it.

Choosing Seats in General:
Centre Block:
The seats are raked and so close to the stage that the atmosphere created is incredibly intimate. Every seat has a good view of the stage. Choose those seats with maximum legroom first: otherwise, anything central should give you a decent view.

Some productions have a comfy wooden wall to lean against beside seats D 10 and 30.

Side Blocks:
Those seated in a side block nearest the back of the playing area will see a rear view of the actors most of the time.

Most seats here are now top price, so take those seats closest to the "centre block" first, if paying it...

The monkey would take B 3, 4, 36 to 38; C 3 to 5 and 35 to 38 and D 3 to 9 and 31 to 38 last, as they used to be second price.

Further along, second price seats are cheaper for the same view, but they are now few and far between, so grab the ones closest to the centre and furthest forward first, but expect to see a lot of backs...

Once second price seats right next to the top price ones have gone, consider taking the more expensive seats or cheaper row B in the side circle instead. The aerial perspective compensates better for the side view in the monkey's opinion - though production designs can mess things up, the monkey notes, hence the stalls can be a safer bet. If you prefer stalls, then take remaining second price seats, remembering that those at the far end can again suffer due to thoughtless staging.

Some productions have a comfy wooden wall to lean against beside seats D9 and 30.

Wheelchairs can replace Stalls seat D31, a fair view and value in Theatremonkey's opinion, better than the space in the Dress Circle

General Hazard Notes:
The box office never sell "restricted view" tickets until sightlines are confirmed, so never worry that you will get a seriously bad ticket if booking way in advance. On the other hand, when the queried seats are released, there may be bargains to be had...

Changes for the current production:
"
The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui": all stalls seats except row D are replaced by tables and chairs around the playing space.

For those with advance tickets booked, the new seating arrangement is:
Row A now "North Seating" block.
Row B 1 to 7: "North Seating" block.
Row B 13 to 29: "West Seating" block.
Row B 31 to 39: "East Seating" block.
Row C 1, 2 and 31 to 40: "East Seating" block.
Row C 3 to 15: "South Seating" block.

See here for layout.
 

Reader Comments:
"Stalls: "Henry IV" (October 2014). Even with the chair set up, they seemed to have a good rake."

"A5 : because the Donmar stage is below the stall's audience's knees the actors are really just performing to the stalls not to the theatre space as a whole. From now on it's stalls or nothing at the Donmar for me. The actors never looked up when I was in the circle, but then the theatre critics probably all sat in the stalls anyway."

"A7: "Splendour" (August 2015). Very restricted due to a piano stool placed there and whenever an actor is sitting there the rest of the action is blocked. My partner in A6 had a better view."

"A 16: "Teddy Ferrara" (October 2015). Seat A16 is a Barclays Front Row £10 ticket. This seat is on the right hand end of the row which runs along the front of the stage, so the view is superb. Only criticism is that the legroom in front of the seat is completely cut across, diagonally, by the step up to the aisle. This didn't affect me, firstly because I'm only 5'5" and secondly because there wasn't anyone sitting in A17 so I could move across, but for someone taller (or if the row was full, that might be a bit of an issue? Having said that, for a tenner, it was great value."

"A25: "One Night In Miami" (October 2016). Sat in stalls A25 (Barclays £10 front row ticket) and got personally serenaded by 'Sam Cooke' (aka Arinze Kene) who stroked my face as he sang to me ....... (Sigh)."

"A27 and A36: "City of Angels" (December 2014). I was fortunate to get front row seats. My friend and I swapped seats after the interval so we got to try out both. A great view from both. The stage was raised to calf level. Leg room was fine, slightly more in A36."

"A37 and 38: a great view of the actor in the last scene only about 6ft away. If I could only get the side stall seats again I would go a few more rows back, so it would be a bit more eye level to the actors, rather than getting a view of them just above the knee when they are close."

"B19 and 20: "Closer" (February 2015). The centre stalls block seats are staggered so that in row B you look between those in row A. An advantage over the side stalls. Legroom a bit more generous than in row A."

"B28 and 29: "Closer" (February 2015). A nice central view. B29 has a clear view but due to the angle of the aisle there is less legroom than in 29 so suitable for the shorter among us."

"B39: "Spelling Bee" (February 2011). good seat but would have preferred to be a bit more up the aisle to get a more central view. This was a free Donmar discovery ticket though (for students) so I couldn't complain! Also sat in A36 and A44, very good seats for the £10 preview price!"

“B40 and 41: “Julius Caesar,” (Chris B). This theatre, as always, feels incredibly intimate. However, this is heightened further for Julius Caesar as the entire theatre is made out to look like a prison, with a definite attention to detail. These seats offer a completely clear and unobstructed view of the while stage area. The usual benches have been replaced by grey individual chairs so you do get a little more space and plenty of legroom.”

"B41: (Vicki). there was ample leg-room and the padded bench was surprisingly comfortable." 

"C1: "St Joan" (December 2016). £30 - good view - only thing that's obscured is maybe part of the screen on the back wall of the stage where images are projected but only the right hand one - not the main one in the centre of the wall, so nothing to spoil the plot. The stage revolves which gives everyone, no matter where you're sitting, a constantly changing view of the action. Tip for that particular seat ... rather than pushing past every one else in the row, go behind the black curtain and nip through the flap at the other end which is right behind the seat!! (great if you need the loo during the interval, or if you need to dash off straight afterwards!!!). Usual peeve is that it was cold in there, but a well placed scarf/wrap helped."

“C14 and 15: “Richard III,” (Chris B). If you are used to the main West End theatres such as Her Majesty’s, Wyndham’s or Queen’s then this will be quite a shock .This was my first time in this theatre and I was amazed at just how small and intimate it is, with only a couple of rows each of the three sides around the stage, and an even smaller circle above. Pretty much wherever you sit you feel close enough to reach out and touch the actors, especially as in this production they were walking in and out down the aisles. So therefore I think these seats are great, you get a ridiculously close, unobstructed view, and as the stage is the floor of the theatre you don’t miss a thing. This section of the seating does look straight on to the stage too, although they look around at all sides, so even if you are not technically face on, you won’t miss much. After a while you’ll start thinking of yourself less as a spectator and more of an extra in a working production!”

"C20: Great seat and could see everything perfectly, very different atmosphere than sitting in the Circle."

"C23: "Spelling Bee" (February 2011), (James, regular contributor) - great seat, no complaints!"

"D23: "The Weir" (May 2013), (Faris), Tt was fantastic - just as the green rating suggests. I have no problems with the Donmar benches. I'm actually quite fond of them and plenty of space to get in and out of seats."

 

DRESS CIRCLE 
called the CIRCLE in this theatre.

Layout:
Two rows of raked seats face the stage, with a further three rows of seats to either side of the playing area. A reader notes in April 2014 that the benches are now individual seats, "The new seats are high in row C (my feet did not touch the floor) and deep, leaving about a leg width between the railing when pulled down. However, they are an improvement to the benches as they delineate your own seat and are definitely more comfortable to sit on."

The monkey agrees.
 

Legroom:
Adequate throughout the circle, best in side block row B and, because of the fun design, row C, where six-foot persons could comfortably stand if they wished - those under 5ft 10 will have legs dangling and knees against the wall in front, though. Row A has least room, those of 5ft 7 plus only getting a little extra comfort by putting toes under the front safety rail. Centre row B allows toes to go through the rail in front, side B rails allow even more legroom (just don't kick those in row A).

Choosing Seats in General:
Centre Block:
Centre block is best in the circle. The rake is good, and this monkey prefers row B to row A as the bar on the front of the circle is less annoying and it feels it's slightly more comfortable. The usual rules on arriving early apply.

Most do prefer centre block stalls row A over these, though, for proximity to the actors. Still, the monkey mantra runs row A centre block first though, followed by circle centre block, then circle sides rows A and B or stalls rows B to D (if legroom is not an issue for A in both levels), and then stalls sides before circle row C.

Standing space behind row B is also fine for those with strong legs.

Side Blocks:
Row A is the same price as the centre block. The monkey would go centre block first.

Row B, at third price, is a bargain - the monkey prefers it over stalls at this low price, though some readers like being that bit closer downstairs. Each to their own, feels the monkey on this one.

And then there is row C...

... Row C is located on the sides of the circle behind rows A and B. It is a bench, but some sadist has screwed it half way up a wall and put a wall in front of the row to lean on. Gymnastics are involved to get onto and stay on the seats, and the row is so narrow that you get to know fellow members of the audience very well while clambering to your seat. Even cheaper than row B, so worth grabbing.

C 12 and 35 have a bit of metal on one side, that works as an arm-rest, if required. Be careful getting off these two seats, though, as there is quite a drop if you misjudge it and land on the staircase.

Notwithstanding these comments the view is often very good and offers exceptional value for money. Theatremonkey notes, however that sometimes staging means you lose a part of the view, and also that esteemed members of the silverhaired community do sometimes have real problems sitting here.

Be aware that you could well miss action on the nearside 2 metres of so of stage.

A wheelchair can also be given space in the Dress Circle, but the view is not good, so choose stalls C31 instead.

Standing space is behind row B. A reader points out that it isn't suitable for those under around 5ft 10 or so. On a visit in 2015, the monkey observed one 5ft 2 person having problems indeed. A kindly usher suggested that they stand at the side of the theatre instead. Beside row B 13 and 34 is a small area with a rail in front. The view isn't great (missing action at the front near corner of the stage and looking through the circle corner bards) but it is raised and doesn't look over heads.

General Hazard Notes:
A thick bar runs around the front of this circle, which like the stalls, surrounds the stage on three sides. This bar is treble height at the corners affecting the view from row A seats 12,14,33 and 35. For musicals, TV screens are also suspended in front of this bar, further affecting views. A further bar runs across row B, but does not affect the view at all. 

Folk leaning forward blocking views from rows behind.

The comedy location of row C.

Missing around two metres of the front or side of the playing area.

Changes for the current production:
None.

Reader Comments:
"Row A: "The Recruiting Officer" (February 2012). We sat at the low numbers end of row A. Admittedly it's not totally comfortable but leg room was fine, and we didn't feel we lost much due to the rail. At £15 they were a bargain really, worth a bit of bottom wriggling towards the interval!"

“A8 and 9: “Berenice,” (Chris B). This theatre is incredibly intimate and atmospheric and the circle is very close to the stage area. These front row seats offer an incredible unobstructed view, close enough to practically touch the actors. They are officially side on but as the actors face all four sides of the theatre this doesn't detract at all. The legroom is plentiful too. It's worth noting that there are no armrests and individual seats aren't clearly defined as the seating is padded benches.”

"A9 and 10: on the side but a pretty decent view and no real problems space-wise. In fact they were the most comfortable bench seats I have ever sat on in a theatre."

"A 14 and 15: (HB). The seats offered good value for the £22 paid but the view is restricted when the cast are at the front of the stage."

"A 20 and 21: "Anna Christie" (September 2011). Central row seats.  Sounds perfect, but in reality the bar, the wire mesh panel and the lights rigged in front of us meant we were constantly having to shift around to get an unobstructed view of the first third of the stage. Really wish Donmar would install clear glass/plastic panels to make viewing easier. As always with upstairs seating at the Donmar, uncomfortable and with a very long first half quite a lot of numb bums by the interval. Side stall seats are better value for money."

"A26: (Mark). Got this through the student free ticket scheme at the Donmar. I prefer the side circle row B for the money you save, especially as now they are only £10. This seat was good though, wouldn't mind sitting here again."

"A38 and 39. Apart from the actors' bow at the end we never saw the actors' faces. Second time I sat in the stalls, it was like seeing a different play."

"A38 and 39: "Henry IV" (October 2014). Was pleasantly surprised by both the view and comfort of seat. Unlike the stalls which have hard plastic chairs the circle had individual padded seats. Being only 5 ft 3 I found I could sit back in my seat to view the entire show. The couple of times action was below me. I discovered I could see beneath the bar. A bargain at £10."

"A44: Good view in general but the bar is so annoying! Much prefer Row B where (for some reason) you can see things a lot better."

"Row B: "Anna Christie" (August 2011), (Gary). Excellent view from row B centre circle."

"Row B: "Privacy" (April 2014). The bench seats in Circle at the sides have now been replaced with pull-down individual seats. I always sit in row B, usually to the left of the stage (from the actors view). The new seats are high (my feet did not touch the floor) and deep, leaving about a leg width between the railing when pulled down. However, they are an improvement to the benches as they delineate your own seat and are definitely more comfortable to sit on."

"B5: (Mark - regular contributor). Great seat and what a lovely venue. You miss little bits of the action but then in a space like this every seat does."

"B6 and 7: "Welcome Home Captain Fox" (April 2016) (thespyinthestalls.com). This was (surprisingly) my first visit to the Donmar so wasn't sure what to expect. The seats in the sides of the circle are (as mentioned before) quite high (as in high above the stage and quite high themselves). For the seat issue you can rest your feet on the bars in front, for the height above the stage, not much you can do but hope that row A don't lean forward. Alas for me two ladies in front (one who had also kindly brought along her Itsu lunch to eat) with enormous hair kept leaning forward. So whereas I'd probably have missed a small amount of action stage left, I missed quite a bit. The seats themselves didn't seem overly comfortable to me and due to the solid bars in front it's quite tight if anyone wants to pass. Unless the seats are a real bargain, I'd avoid the sides of the circle again and either go row A circle middle section or the stalls."

"B7: (Mark - regular contributor). Was pretty comfortable, being only 5'6 I could make good use of the rails in front of me and sit with feet up or down, mainly the up option. From this side of the playing area you get a very good view of Mr Thaxtons amply filled underwear in the first scene. (worth the ticket price alone). (Not always an extra that will be available, the monkey notes)."

"B8: "Spelling Bee" (February 2011), (Mark). As always excellent value for money, with a great clear view."

"B23 and B24: plenty of leg room, the back rest was too upright for me, we was last to be seated and the people on each side had left enough room. A good view of the stage, apart from the front end was blocked by the bar that you mention. but, there was not much happening there, so it did not spoil the play I saw. I would recommend the Domar to anybody that would like to see their favourite actor close up. A very nice intimate theatre!"  

"B 38 and 39:  'Passion' (September 2010), (Lee). If you are going for Circle seats and have to take a side block, an important scene took place right below the circle on the side we were sitting. We were in the Circle row B seats 38 and 39 which for most scenes was an excellent view but for this scene the people on Row A leaned forward blocking some of the action."

Reader agrees,
"B43: (David Hurrell). is fine."

As a day seat, another reader says,
"B45 (paid £15). Note this is the furthest seat on the edge, but I didn't feel I missed out. At one or two times through the play my ears kind of zoned in on a slightly annoying buzzing noise (lighting, thinks the monkey) coming from my left, sounded like some sort of air cooler but could only really hear it in the very quiet parts. If you have a bizarre sense of hearing I can imagine it becoming quite annoying. It didn't really bother me though."

"C6: "Limehouse" (February 2017). Bargain for £10. These will be my go to seats at the Donmar now - no need to pay more."

"Standing: (Taljaard). The standing at the Donmar is in the circle and there is a rail to lean on, so it was fine and an absolute bargain!"

"Standing: "Anna Christie" (August 2011). The £7.50 standing tickets are the bargain of the West End if your bladder and your legs can last. The standing tickets don’t allocate you a specific place at the back – it’s first come first served. So if you want to stand in the middle rather than towards the sides, you should get there sharp."

 

 


Notes

Total 252 seats. Some standing places also sold at box office discretion.

Air-cooled auditorium. Not as effective as proper air conditioning, so be prepared for a hot and uncomfortable time in the height of summer, alas. To minimise the effects, seating in the front stalls is normally coolest as heat rises - and is also trapped in Circle overhangs. Just a bit of advice from someone in the theatre industry who has a grasp of physics...

Induction loop system. Signed performances regularly, occasional audio described performances. Guide dogs welcome in auditorium or dog sitter available. Wheelchairs have  level access is through the shopping mall, near a store called Quicksilver. The mall closes at 6.30 p.m. Users should pick a matinee or pre arrange the access to be opened if they want to leave after the evening show. Failing that, a ramp offers access to the narrow foyer corridor, with a lift to all levels. The adapted toilet is in the circle when the most used adapted seat / wheelchair space is in the stalls!

Wheelchair users can book on the usual box office number: 0844 871 7624. Choose the "access" option when offered.

Signed / Captioned / Audio described performance bookings can be booked on 020 7845 8573. Enquiries can be made to access@donmarwarehouse.com. At the moment Deaf patrons can reserve tickets using email. Then they  can either buy the seats by visiting the theatre in person, ask someone to call to pay by phone on their behalf or alternatively contact the venue via Text Reply. PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS PARTICULAR PHONE NUMBER AND EMAIL ADDRESS ARE ONLY FOR ASSISTED PERFORMANCE USERS, AND ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR GENERAL PUBLIC BOOKINGS.

https://www.donmarwarehouse.com/visit/access/ has comprehensive details, plus a helpful "Visual Story" download for those on the autistic spectrum.

No food except confectionery and Ice Cream.

Two bars, Stalls and Circle.

Five toilets. Stalls 1 gents 1 cubicle, 1 ladies 2 cubicles; Circle 1 gents 1 cubicle, 1 ladies 2 cubicles, 1 disabled unisex.

 

Top Performance Times Ticket Prices Where to Buy Tickets  Seating Plan Seat Opinions Getting Here

Getting to this Theatre
Find this theatre on a Street Map
Nearest Underground Station Buses Car Park
Nearest Underground Station:
Covent Garden - Piccadilly (dark blue) line.

Leave the underground station and turn to the left. Walk straight on to a road called Long Acre. This is what you should see in front of you - Neal Street, the road you will want is to the right:
If instead of a road you see a pedestrianised area, Wrong way, turn around. 

Cross Long Acre to the other side of the road from the underground station. Turn to your right. Keep walking, the first turning on your left is Neal Street - as the picture above indicates. Take it. If instead you come to Langley Street first, wrong way.


The view up Neal Street.

At the end of Neal Street is a three-way road junction:

Look and turn to your left. The middle road is Earlham Street:
 

Cross into it and the theatre is a tiny shop doorway on the far side of the road, with a neon name sign above, set into a trendy pale brick shopping mall:

If you enter a pedestrian zone, or Shelton Street, wrong way.
_____________________

An alternate (some feel easier and safer) route from Leicester Square Underground Station is illustrated here - and the tube journey to the station can be planned using the banner below:

 

 

Buses:
None stop outside the theatre. Number 14, 19, 24, 29, 38 and 176 stop on Charing Cross Road or Shaftesbury Avenue. As a starting point, stand in front of the Palace Theatre - home of Les Misérables. Turn your back to it. Cross the road ahead of you to put yourself in front of the large Pizza Hut restaurant. Turn to your left and walk past the restaurant to Shaftesbury Avenue. This is the only road to have traffic divided by heavy railings in the centre of the road. Got it, good. Turn right into Shaftesbury Avenue, Cross over West Street, then notice the next road, Earlham Street, right next to it. Walk down Earlham Street, passing the Mountbatten Hotel. At the top of the street is an open space with a column monument in the centre of it. The Cambridge Theatre is behind this. Careful - in the absence of kerbstones cars and pedestrians mix on the cobbles of this junction. Cross the road to the Cambridge Theatre and take the road to the left of it, Earlham Street. Walk along the side of the theatre and pass entrances to a shopping mall. The Donmar is beyond the mall, a tiny neon signed doorway.

 

Taxi:
A rank for Black taxis is at Charing Cross Station - a good distance from the theatre. Walk up Earlham Street to Charing Cross Road to increase your chances of hailing a taxi in the street.

 

Car Park:
Newport Place, China Town. On leaving, use Gerard Street to get you onto Shaftesbury Avenue. On Shaftesbury Avenue look to your right. The brown brick building to your right is the Palace Theatre. Don't bother crossing the road, but turn to your right on Shaftesbury Avenue and walk in the direction of it. When you come to the main road intersection in front of Shaftesbury Avenue, cross Charing Cross Road at the traffic lights. Go straight on, entering the other half of Shaftesbury Avenue for a few moments. continue up it, crossing West Street. Just past that is Earlham Street. Turn into it and walk to the end, crossing Tower Street. Ahead of you is an open space (Seven Dials) with a pillar in the centre of it. The Cambridge Theatre is clearly visible behind that.

Careful - in the absence of kerbstones cars and pedestrians mix on the cobbles of this junction. Cross the road to the Cambridge Theatre and take the road to the left of it as you faced it across the square, Earlham Street. Walk along the side of the theatre and pass entrances to a shopping mall. The Donmar is beyond the mall, a tiny neon signed doorway.

The "Theatreland Parking Scheme" may be available. Call Q-Park car parks on 0870 442 0104 or see http://www.q-park.co.uk for details. At this car park, parking under the "Theatreland Parking Scheme" allows a 50% discount in cost. Spaces CANNOT be reserved at these prices, so choose whether you would prefer to book and pay more, or use this scheme.

If you choose the "Theatreland Parking Scheme", you must get your car park ticket validated at the theatre's box office counter (the theatre attendant will insert the car parking ticket into a small machine which updates the information held on the magnetic strip on the reverse, thus enabling the discount). When you pay using the machines at the car park, 50% will be deducted from the full tariff. You may park for up to 24 hours using this scheme and it is endorsed by the Society of London Theatre.

For a full list of car parks and theatres that participate in the 50% off theatreland scheme see http://www.q-park.co.uk.


 

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